Showing 247 results for tag Identity

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere? Where are we made to feel welcome? Where do we feel unwelcome and unsafe? How do race, language, gender identity, family structure, faith, where we work, and where we live shape how we are seen, welcomed, and accepted? Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us.

Event | July 15, 2019

Conversation Project: Race and Adoption

The decision to adopt across racial or cultural lines is a lifelong commitment to exploring matters of race and identity, confronting racism in all its forms, and developing new skills and perspectives. In this conversation, facilitator Astrid Castro will ask participants to explore questions such as, What role do race and racism play in your family? What are the personal experiences that inform how you talk to adopted children in your life about where they are from? Where do you need to grow to be the best resource you can be for children who are adopted? While particularly of relevance to families directly in transracial adoptive families, this conversation will also raise questions of how we talk to children about important issues like race and identity, adoption, and cultural appropriation.

Event | June 14, 2019

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Global displacement is on the rise, thanks to intractable conflicts, economics, and climate change. Oregonians have and will continue to see the results of international migration in our neighborhoods. In this conversation, Manuel Padilla, who has worked with refugees in Haiti, Chad, and Washington, DC, asks participants to consider questions of uprootedness, hospitality, identity, perception, and integration and how we might build more informed, responsive, resilient, and vibrant communities. A $5 donation is suggested. No person will be turned away for lack of funds.

Event | June 18, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | September 16, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

What are the stories that shape how we think about growing old? How do we acknowledge the unique differences among aging individuals and separate the true stories from the myths? How do we accept the wisdom of our elders’ experiences while also recognizing new ideas about what it means to age in America? No matter our age, we all hear and tell stories about growing older that reflect our own ideals and fears—and the ideals and fears of our communities. Join facilitator Melissa Madenski as we look at the power of story in a conversation that will ask you to share your own experiences and ideas about aging and listen to the perspectives of others in your community.

Event | July 10, 2019

Conversation Project: Is Technology Outpacing Our Humanity?

Technology is often considered a cure-all to our modern challenges. It is, undeniably, a powerful tool in addressing our greatest endeavors. Whether it be automation, the iPhone, or gene editing, some say our technical capacities have outstripped our moral knowledge. Others believe they have provided us immense creativity in dealing with our biggest ethical questions. Are these mutually exclusive? Facilitator Manuel Padilla will lead this conversation to explore how technology shapes our moral reasoning and our perceptions of, and relationships with, one another.

Event | April 30, 2019

Conversation Project: Is Technology Outpacing Our Humanity?

Technology is often considered a cure-all to our modern challenges. It is, undeniably, a powerful tool in addressing our greatest endeavors. Whether it be automation, the iPhone, or gene editing, some say our technical capacities have outstripped our moral knowledge. Others believe they have provided us immense creativity in dealing with our biggest ethical questions. Are these mutually exclusive? Facilitator Manuel Padilla will lead this conversation to explore how technology shapes our moral reasoning and our perceptions of, and relationships with, one another.

Event | May 1, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Popular understandings of leadership tell us that leaders look a certain way: they are in charge. They possess outward strength. They are extroverted and act pragmatically rather than emotionally. Perhaps most important, leaders are people in positions of authority and power. Join facilitator Pepe Moscoso for a conversation that explores an alternative view of leadership and asks, When are we leaders in our communities? How can our unique senses of self contribute to our roles as leaders? What do we have to offer that is needed? Participants will have the chance to ask these questions of themselves and to explore with their friends and neighbors what makes a great leader in their communities.

Event | May 9, 2019

Black Mark, Black Legend

Intisar Abioto explores the legacy of Black artists in Portland and the meaning of that history for current creators in the community, as part of Oregon Humanities' Emerging Journalists, Community Stories fellowship program.

Beyond the Margins | April 25, 2019

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere? Where are we made to feel welcome? Where do we feel unwelcome and unsafe? How do race, language, gender identity, family structure, faith, where we work, and where we live shape how we are seen, welcomed, and accepted? Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us.

Event | May 21, 2019

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere? Where are we made to feel welcome? Where do we feel unwelcome and unsafe? How do race, language, gender identity, family structure, faith, where we work, and where we live shape how we are seen, welcomed, and accepted? Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us.

Event | May 20, 2019

Conversation Project: Is Technology Outpacing Our Humanity?

Technology is often considered a cure-all to our modern challenges. It is, undeniably, a powerful tool in addressing our greatest endeavors. Whether it be automation, the iPhone, or gene editing, some say our technical capacities have outstripped our moral knowledge. Others believe they have provided us immense creativity in dealing with our biggest ethical questions. Are these mutually exclusive? Facilitator Manuel Padilla will lead this conversation to explore how technology shapes our moral reasoning and our perceptions of, and relationships with, one another. This event will take place in the board room at Portland Public Schools' main office.

Event | May 20, 2019

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Global displacement is on the rise, thanks to intractable conflicts, economics, and climate change. Oregonians have and will continue to see the results of international migration in our neighborhoods. In this conversation, Manuel Padilla, who has worked with refugees in Haiti, Chad, and Washington, DC, asks participants to consider questions of uprootedness, hospitality, identity, perception, and integration and how we might build more informed, responsive, resilient, and vibrant communities.

Event | April 17, 2019

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Global displacement is on the rise, thanks to intractable conflicts, economics, and climate change. Oregonians have and will continue to see the results of international migration in our neighborhoods. In this conversation, Manuel Padilla, who has worked with refugees in Haiti, Chad, and Washington, DC, asks participants to consider questions of uprootedness, hospitality, identity, perception, and integration and how we might build more informed, responsive, resilient, and vibrant communities.

Event | April 17, 2019

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Global displacement is on the rise, thanks to intractable conflicts, economics, and climate change. Oregonians have and will continue to see the results of international migration in our neighborhoods. In this conversation, Manuel Padilla, who has worked with refugees in Haiti, Chad, and Washington, DC, asks participants to consider questions of uprootedness, hospitality, identity, perception, and integration and how we might build more informed, responsive, resilient, and vibrant communities.

Event | April 16, 2019

Conversation Project: Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

As individuals and groups, we experience different levels of privilege and power. Recognizing our relationship to oppression can bring feelings of guilt, shame, and grief. How can we hold space for these feelings while also creating conditions for new insights to emerge to deepen our understanding of each other and ourselves? Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives. This conversation will include some hands-on activities.

Event | April 16, 2019

Conversation Project: Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

As individuals and groups, we experience different levels of privilege and power. Recognizing our relationship to oppression can bring feelings of guilt, shame, and grief. How can we hold space for these feelings while also creating conditions for new insights to emerge to deepen our understanding of each other and ourselves? Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives. This conversation will include some hands-on activities.

Event | April 16, 2019

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere? Where are we made to feel welcome? Where do we feel unwelcome and unsafe? How do race, language, gender identity, family structure, faith, where we work, and where we live shape how we are seen, welcomed, and accepted? Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us. This event will take place in the Keeston Room.

Event | June 27, 2019

Conversation Project: Race and Adoption

The decision to adopt across racial or cultural lines is a lifelong commitment to exploring matters of race and identity, confronting racism in all its forms, and developing new skills and perspectives. In this conversation, facilitator Astrid Castro will ask participants to explore questions such as, What role do race and racism play in your family? What are the personal experiences that inform how you talk to adopted children in your life about where they are from? Where do you need to grow to be the best resource you can be for children who are adopted? While particularly of relevance to families directly in transracial adoptive families, this conversation will also raise questions of how we talk to children about important issues like race and identity, adoption, and cultural appropriation. This event will take place in the Community Room.

Event | May 11, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | April 22, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Popular understandings of leadership tell us that leaders look a certain way: they are in charge. They possess outward strength. They are extroverted and act pragmatically rather than emotionally. Perhaps most important, leaders are people in positions of authority and power. Join facilitator Pepe Moscoso for a conversation that explores an alternative view of leadership and asks, When are we leaders in our communities? How can our unique senses of self contribute to our roles as leaders? What do we have to offer that is needed? Participants will have the chance to ask these questions of themselves and to explore with their friends and neighbors what makes a great leader in their communities.

Event | May 15, 2019

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Although Census data show Oregon’s population becoming more racially diverse, the state remains one of the whitest in the nation. Many Oregonians value racial diversity and the dimension and depth it adds to our lives, yet we remain largely isolated from one another and have yet to fulfill the vision of a racially integrated society. Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation about the challenges to creating racially diverse, inclusive communities despite the accomplishments since the civil rights era. What does the racial integration of place require of us, and how might we prepare to create and embrace this opportunity?

Event | May 3, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | May 2, 2019

Conversation Project: Listening to Young People

What does it look like when adults really listen to young people? Cultural beliefs about young people perpetuate myths that cause harm, especially when combined with laws that control their physical and emotional autonomy and limit their ability to participate in public life. Young people experiencing marginalization for any reason—race, gender, sexuality, ability—also have the added layer of not being taken seriously because of their age. And yet the history of social justice movements in the United States is deeply connected to young people’s agency, autonomy, and power. Join facilitator Emily Squires for a conversation that asks folks to explore their own beliefs about what it means to be young and to reflect on their individual relationship to power as it relates to age.

Event | May 1, 2019

Conversation Project: Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

As individuals and groups, we experience different levels of privilege and power. Recognizing our relationship to oppression can bring feelings of guilt, shame, and grief. How can we hold space for these feelings while also creating conditions for new insights to emerge to deepen our understanding of each other and ourselves? Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives. This conversation will include some hands-on activities.

Event | April 29, 2019

Conversation Project: Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

As individuals and groups, we experience different levels of privilege and power. Recognizing our relationship to oppression can bring feelings of guilt, shame, and grief. How can we hold space for these feelings while also creating conditions for new insights to emerge to deepen our understanding of each other and ourselves? Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives. This conversation will include some hands-on activities.

Event | April 29, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | April 28, 2019

Conversation Project: Race and Adoption

The decision to adopt across racial or cultural lines is a lifelong commitment to exploring matters of race and identity, confronting racism in all its forms, and developing new skills and perspectives. In this conversation, facilitator Astrid Castro will ask participants to explore questions such as, What role do race and racism play in your family? What are the personal experiences that inform how you talk to adopted children in your life about where they are from? Where do you need to grow to be the best resource you can be for children who are adopted? While particularly of relevance to families directly in transracial adoptive families, this conversation will also raise questions of how we talk to children about important issues like race and identity, adoption, and cultural appropriation.

Event | April 18, 2019

Airlie Poetry Night

Airlie Press, a nonprofit publisher, is hosting a free, public, open poetry event at Devil's Den Wine Bar in the Alberta Arts District as part of the Association of Writers and Publishers (AWP) conference. This event is family-friendly, all-ages, and open to anyone interested in reading their work. The event will also featured notable local writers.

Event | March 29, 2019

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Although Census data show Oregon’s population becoming more racially diverse, the state remains one of the whitest in the nation. Many Oregonians value racial diversity and the dimension and depth it adds to our lives, yet we remain largely isolated from one another and have yet to fulfill the vision of a racially integrated society. Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation about the challenges to creating racially diverse, inclusive communities despite the accomplishments since the civil rights era. What does the racial integration of place require of us, and how might we prepare to create and embrace this opportunity?

Event | April 3, 2019

Conversation Project: What Are You? Mixed-Race and Interracial Families in Oregon’s Past and Future

The number of mixed-race people and interracial families in Oregon is growing. What are the challenges and benefits of growing up mixed-race, raising mixed-race children, or being an interracial couple in a state that’s historically been mostly white? How can we openly discuss our own ethnic and racial heritage with each other without being regarded as odd or unusual? How have the answers to “What are you?” changed through the decades? Dmae Roberts, who has written essays and produced film and radio documentaries about being a biracial Asian American in Oregon, leads a discussion of heritage that goes beyond checking one race on US Census forms.

Event | April 19, 2019

Conversation Project: Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives.

Event | March 25, 2019

Conversation Project: Recognizing the Diversity Among Us

Regardless of who we are or where we live, each of us lives among a diverse and vibrant collection of people and cultures. Reflecting on our differences can help us to see ourselves and “others” as part of our whole ecosystem. Awareness and appreciation of the ways that we are different from each other has all kinds of positive impact in our lives, creating in us a feeling of community and inspiring respect, empathy, and solidarity. Join facilitator Miguel Angel Herrada for a conversation that takes a new look at this idea and explores how a deep understanding of diversity can be an indispensable tool for making better choices about the world we share. This event will be conducted in Spanish.

Event | March 29, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | April 25, 2019

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Global displacement is on the rise, thanks to intractable conflicts, economics, and climate change. Oregonians have and will continue to see the results of international migration in our neighborhoods. In this conversation, Manuel Padilla, who has worked with refugees in Haiti, Chad, and Washington, DC, asks participants to consider questions of uprootedness, hospitality, identity, perception, and integration and how we might build more informed, responsive, resilient, and vibrant communities.

Event | March 6, 2019

Conversation Project: White Allyship in Close-knit Communities

In this conversation led by facilitator Alexis James, participants will have the chance to explore their identities, learn how to acknowledge different lived experiences without alienating friends and neighbors, and move toward action in their own communities.

Event | February 7, 2019

Conversation Project: Race and Adoption

In this conversation, facilitator Astrid Castro will ask participants to explore questions such as, What role do race and racism play in your family?

Event | February 19, 2019

Conversation Project: In Good Faith

Exploring Religious Difference in Oregon

Event | February 24, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | February 16, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

Stories of Aging in Oregon and Beyond

Event | January 25, 2019

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Immigrants, Refugees, and Oregon

Event | January 25, 2019

More than Words

Emilly Prado explores the stories of three families in the small rural border town of Nyssa, Oregon, and how immigration policy changes have affected their lives.

This Land | December 20, 2018

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

Stories of Aging in Oregon and Beyond

Event | January 26, 2019

Conversation Project: Race and Adoption

In this conversation, facilitator Astrid Castro will ask participants to explore questions such as, What role do race and racism play in your family? What are the personal experiences that inform how you talk to adopted children in your life about where they are from? Where do you need to grow to be the best resource you can be for children who are adopted?

Event | January 27, 2019

CANCELED: Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Immigrants, Refugees, and Oregon

Event | February 10, 2019

CANCELED: Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

Stories of Aging in Oregon and Beyond

Event | February 10, 2019

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Although Census data show Oregon’s population becoming more racially diverse, the state remains one of the whitest in the nation. Many Oregonians value racial diversity and the dimension and depth it adds to our lives, yet we remain largely isolated from one another and have yet to fulfill the vision of a racially integrated society. Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation about the challenges to creating racially diverse, inclusive communities despite the accomplishments since the civil rights era. What does the racial integration of place require of us, and how might we prepare to create and embrace this opportunity?

Event | March 10, 2019

Conversation Project: What Are You? Mixed-Race and Interracial Families in Oregon’s Past and Future

The number of mixed-race people and interracial families in Oregon is growing. What are the challenges and benefits of growing up mixed-race, raising mixed-race children, or being an interracial couple in a state that’s historically been mostly white? How can we openly discuss our own ethnic and racial heritage with each other without being regarded as odd or unusual? How have the answers to “What are you?” changed through the decades? Dmae Roberts, who has written essays and produced film and radio documentaries about being a biracial Asian American in Oregon, leads a discussion of heritage that goes beyond checking one race on US Census forms.

Event | March 10, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | March 12, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | May 18, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | April 4, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

What are the stories that shape how we think about growing old? How do we acknowledge the unique differences among aging individuals and separate the true stories from the myths? How do we accept the wisdom of our elders’ experiences while also recognizing new ideas about what it means to age in America? No matter our age, we all hear and tell stories about growing older that reflect our own ideals and fears—and the ideals and fears of our communities. Join facilitator Melissa Madenski as we look at the power of story in a conversation that will ask you to share your own experiences and ideas about aging and listen to the perspectives of others in your community.

Event | April 13, 2019

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere? Where are we made to feel welcome? Where do we feel unwelcome and unsafe? How do race, language, gender identity, family structure, faith, where we work, and where we live shape how we are seen, welcomed, and accepted? Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us.

Event | April 18, 2019

Conversation Project: Listening to Young People

What does it look like when adults really listen to young people? Cultural beliefs about young people perpetuate myths that cause harm, especially when combined with laws that control their physical and emotional autonomy and limit their ability to participate in public life. Young people experiencing marginalization for any reason—race, gender, sexuality, ability—also have the added layer of not being taken seriously because of their age. And yet the history of social justice movements in the United States is deeply connected to young people’s agency, autonomy, and power. Join facilitator Emily Squires for a conversation that asks folks to explore their own beliefs about what it means to be young and to reflect on their individual relationship to power as it relates to age. This event will take place in the Wilson High School Library

Event | April 18, 2019

Conversation Project: Talking About Dying

Death is a universal event that transcends many of the differences between us, but it's not something that we have regular opportunities to think and talk about. Oregon Humanities developed the Talking about Dying program to create more public opportunities to reflect on the stories and influences that shape our thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members. Talking about Dying community conversations are free, ninety-minute facilitated discussions geared toward public audiences (ages 15+). During the program, participants talk together about questions such as, What do we want—and not want—at the end of our life? How might our family, culture, religion, and beliefs shape how we think about death? How do access to care, geography, and desires to be remembered affect our decisions about the end of our life? Facilitated by Andrea Cano.

Event | May 2, 2019

Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

In 2015, Oregon’s population exceeded 4 million people. Not only are we growing in number, we’re also changing demographically. Considering that Oregon has a history of racial exclusion, these changes prompt questions about Oregonian identity and values. How do we build communities that welcome people of all backgrounds? How are minority and under-represented populations included and treated today? Drawing on the diverse histories and backgrounds of attendees, Kerani Mitchell leads a conversation that asks what makes us Oregonian and how can we create inclusive communities.

Event | May 9, 2019

Conversation Project: Recognizing the Diversity Among Us

Regardless of who we are or where we live, each of us lives among a diverse and vibrant collection of people and cultures. Reflecting on our differences can help us to see ourselves and “others” as part of our whole ecosystem. Awareness and appreciation of the ways that we are different from each other has all kinds of positive impact in our lives, creating in us a feeling of community and inspiring respect, empathy, and solidarity. Join facilitator Miguel Angel Herrada for a conversation that takes a new look at this idea and explores how a deep understanding of diversity can be an indispensable tool for making better choices about the world we share.

Event | May 21, 2019

Peace and Dignity

Mohamed Asem writes about finding community in shared stories of unjust detention in an excerpt from his memoir, Stranger in the Pen.

Magazine | December 13, 2018

Croppings: Enrique Chagoya, Reverse Anthropology

Through January 27, 2019, at the Hallie Ford Museum of Art

Magazine | December 13, 2018

Questioning Assumptions and Starting Conversations

Kerani Mitchell writes about her experience as a Conversation Project facilitator.

Article | December 12, 2018

Bias and Kids: How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children?

During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | December 11, 2018

Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before.

Event | December 11, 2018

Conversation Project: In Good Faith

Religion is a topic traditionally not discussed in mixed company. But what do we lose when we avoid exploring our religious differences? Oregon is among the states in the US where people are most likely to identify as religiously unaffiliated. Many Oregonians have spiritual practices that both align with and transcend institutional definitions. Others filter strongly held values through religious traditions and frameworks. Writer and former chaplain Elizabeth Harlan-Ferlo will lead participants in examining the tools we use to talk about religion without dismissing others’ beliefs or flattening the beautiful and sometimes harrowing complexities of our experiences. At the host’s request, this conversation may be customized to fit the specific needs of their community.

Event | March 4, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | March 12, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | March 15, 2019

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Power dynamics influence who benefits from certain cultural experience, and—given the global nature of our world—parts of our individual and cultural identities are shaped by cultures other than our own. How do we make sense of this and what effect does it have on us as individuals and as Oregonians? Facilitator Surabhi Majahan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | April 16, 2019

Conversation Project: What Does It Mean to Be American?

The United States is a culturally diverse nation with residents who can trace their heritage to countries across the globe, and our diversity is projected to continue to increase over the next several decades. Given the differences of race, ethnicity, place, religion, wealth, language, education, and ideology that exist in the US, what are the things that unite us a nation? How do we understand what it means to be American and what we hold valuable? Join this conversation led by facilitator Ellen Knutson to share your ideas about what it means to be American and hear others’ ideas, to identify differences and points of connection that may lead us toward the ideal stated in our nation’s motto: E pluribus unum, out of many, one.

Event | April 17, 2019

Conversation Project: From the Desert to the Sea

What are people really asking when they ask, “Where do you live?” In Oregon, philosophical and political divides have deep connections to geographic location. This conversation, led by author Kristy Athens, will explore the assumptions Oregonians have historically made about each other based on both literal and figurative place—including east versus west and urban versus rural—as well as the potential benefits and harms of conflating where you are (or have been) with who you are.

Event | April 24, 2019

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Immigrants, Refugees, and Oregon

Event | January 23, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | January 28, 2019

Conversation Project: Is Technology Outpacing Our Humanity?

Facilitator Manuel Padilla will lead this conversation to explore how technology shapes our moral reasoning and our perceptions of, and relationships with, one another.

Event | January 30, 2019

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | February 28, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Self-sufficiency and American Life

Event | February 28, 2019

Conversation Project: Listening to Young People

What does it look like when adults really listen to young people? Cultural beliefs about young people perpetuate myths that cause harm, especially when combined with laws that control their physical and emotional autonomy and limit their ability to participate in public life. Young people experiencing marginalization for any reason—race, gender, sexuality, ability—also have the added layer of not being taken seriously because of their age. And yet the history of social justice movements in the United States is deeply connected to young people’s agency, autonomy, and power. Join facilitator Emily Squires for a conversation that asks folks to explore their own beliefs about what it means to be young and to reflect on their individual relationship to power as it relates to age.

Event | April 13, 2019

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead a conversation that explores cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | January 16, 2019

My Name

Sravya Tadepalli writes about her experiences with people mispronouncing her name.

Beyond the Margins | November 29, 2018

Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

In 2015, Oregon’s population exceeded 4 million people. Not only are we growing in number, we’re also changing demographically. Considering that Oregon has a history of racial exclusion, these changes prompt questions about Oregonian identity and values. How do we build communities that welcome people of all backgrounds? How are minority and under-represented populations included and treated today? Drawing on the diverse histories and backgrounds of attendees, Kerani Mitchell leads a conversation that asks what makes us Oregonian and how can we create inclusive communities.

Event | April 2, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children?

Event | December 13, 2018

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | December 14, 2018

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | January 17, 2019

Conversation Project: Is Technology Outpacing Our Humanity?

Facilitator Manuel Padilla will lead this conversation to explore how technology shapes our moral reasoning and our perceptions of, and relationships with, one another.

Event | January 17, 2019

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Immigrants, Refugees, and Oregon

Event | November 6, 2018

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children?

Event | October 18, 2018

Conversation Project: What Does It Mean to Be American?

Join this conversation led by facilitator Ellen Knutson to share your ideas about what it means to be American and hear others’ ideas, to identify differences and points of connection that may lead us toward the ideal stated in our nation’s motto: E pluribus unum, out of many, one.

Event | November 3, 2018

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces?

Event | October 20, 2018

Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives. This conversation will include some hands-on activities.

Event | October 19, 2018

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Immigrants, Refugees, and Oregon

Event | October 1, 2018

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation about the challenges to creating racially diverse, inclusive communities despite the accomplishments since the civil rights era.

Event | October 1, 2018

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children? This event will be held in Spanish

Event | October 16, 2018

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation about the challenges to creating racially diverse, inclusive communities despite the accomplishments since the civil rights era.

Event | October 29, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Adoption

In this conversation, facilitator Astrid Castro will ask participants to explore questions such as, What role do race and racism play in your family? What are the personal experiences that inform how you talk to adopted children in your life about where they are from? Where do you need to grow to be the best resource you can be for children who are adopted?

Event | November 6, 2018

Conversation Project: The Space Between Us

Immigrants, Refugees, and Oregon

Event | October 23, 2018

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | October 11, 2018

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children?

Event | October 20, 2018

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before.

Event | September 16, 2018

People, Not Pundits

Catherine Johnson writes about attending a conservative convention in an effort to understand her mother's politics.

Magazine | August 30, 2018

Conversation Project: Just a Number

Aging and Intergenerational Friendship

Event | August 3, 2018

Black. Muslim. Woman.

Tiara Darnell talks to Fatmah Worfeley, a nineteen-year-old Portland activist and student, about racism within the Muslim community, her parents’ interracial marriage, reconciling her Palestinian and Libyan heritage, and coming to terms with her Blackness.

Beyond the Margins | May 29, 2018

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | May 22, 2018

Becoming Asian

Scot Nakagawa explores the roots of race and the model minority myth

Magazine | April 27, 2018

Gamanfest: Reclaiming Identity Through Art and Activism

Inspired by the spirit of gaman—"perseverance" or "endurance"—and those Japanese Americans who were unjustly incarcerated in government camps during World War II, this festival serves as a venue for artists and activists within the Asian American community who use their heritage and culture as motivation for the work they create.

Event | May 12, 2018

Gamanfest: Reclaiming Identity Through Art and Activism

Inspired by the spirit of gaman—"perseverance" or "endurance"—and those Japanese Americans who were unjustly incarcerated in government camps during World War II, this festival serves as a venue for artists and activists within the Asian American community who use their heritage and culture as motivation for the work they create.

Event | May 11, 2018

Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

Drawing on the diverse histories and backgrounds of participants, Kerani Mitchell leads a conversation that asks what makes us Oregonian and how can we create inclusive communities.

Event | September 6, 2018

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | July 13, 2018

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | July 25, 2018

Conversation Project: Ritual and Ceremony in Modern Life

Holly Pruett leads a conversation about the role of ritual and ceremony in participants’ family and cultural histories, the impact of life events that have passed unobserved, and the new ceremonies that people are creating to mark these milestones.

Event | August 15, 2018

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | April 26, 2018

Conversation Project: Just a Number

Aging and Intergenerational Friendship

Event | May 4, 2018

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | April 11, 2018

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | May 19, 2018

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | March 24, 2018

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Many Oregonians value racial diversity and the dimension and depth it adds to our lives, yet we remain largely isolated from one another and have yet to fulfill the vision of a racially integrated society. Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation that explores some of the causes of this continued isolation and the differences of experience between Oregonians of different races.

Event | July 14, 2018

Conversation Project: Just a Number

Event | March 2, 2018

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation that explores the differences of experience between Oregonians of different races, such as institutional racism, white privilege, and unconscious bias.

Event | February 21, 2018

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories about Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention?

Event | April 3, 2018

Black History Month Film Series: "I Am Not Your Negro"

Self Enhancement, Inc. presents Raoul Peck's film I Am Not Your Negro, followed by a panel discussion with Aisha Karefa-Smart, a niece of James Baldwin, and Darrais Carter, assistant professor of Black studies at Portland State university. This program is made possible in part by a Responsive Program Grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | February 17, 2018

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | February 17, 2018

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | February 17, 2018

Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians

Event | March 10, 2018

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation that explores some of the causes of this continued isolation and the differences of experience between Oregonians of different races—such as institutional racism, white privilege, and unconscious bias.

Event | March 5, 2018

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation that explores some of the causes of this continued isolation and the differences of experience between Oregonians of different races—such as institutional racism, white privilege, and unconscious bias.

Event | March 7, 2018

Conversation Project: Ritual and Ceremony in Modern Life

Holly Pruett, a life-cycle celebrant who works with individuals, families, and communities to commemorate such occasions, leads a conversation about the role of ritual and ceremony in participants’ family and cultural histories and the new ceremonies that people are creating to mark these milestones.

Event | May 19, 2018

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation that explores some of the causes of this continued isolation and the differences of experience between Oregonians of different races—such as institutional racism, white privilege, and unconscious bias.

Event | February 17, 2018

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | January 30, 2018

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | October 28, 2017

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | February 1, 2018

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | March 22, 2018

Conversation Project: Ritual and Ceremony in Modern Life

Holly Pruett, a life-cycle celebrant who works with individuals, families, and communities to commemorate such occasions, leads a conversation about the role of ritual and ceremony in participants’ family and cultural histories.

Event | April 19, 2018

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere? Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us.

Event | April 26, 2018

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

Event | June 10, 2018

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories about Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention?

Event | June 14, 2018

Conversation Project: Just a Number

Aging and Intergenerational Friendship

Event | March 27, 2018

Alternate Endings, Radical Beginnings

A program of short videos by Visual AIDS

Event | December 1, 2017

Unresolved Issues of the Twentieth Century: The Quest For the Repatriation of Nazi Looted Art

Donald S. Burris, one of a small group of American lawyers who have dedicated their careers to assisting survivors and their heirs in regaining artworks stolen from them by the Nazis, will talk about his firm's successful retrieval of Gustav Klimt's "Woman in Gold."

Event | December 5, 2017

Conversation Project: Just a Number

Aging and Intergenerational Friendship

Event | April 7, 2018

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere? Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us.

Event | April 2, 2018

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | November 1, 2017

Conversation Project: What Does It Mean to Be American?

Given the differences of race, ethnicity, place, religion, wealth, language, education, and ideology that exist in the US, what are the things that unite us a nation?

Event | February 7, 2018

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | April 30, 2018

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

What systems are in place to prevent the racial integration and equity many of us strive for? Knowing what we do, how do we act—as individuals and communities—to embrace the opportunity presented by a more diverse Oregon?

Event | October 26, 2017

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories about Wealth, Status, and Power

What exactly is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation.

Event | April 21, 2018

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us.

Event | November 10, 2017

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | October 28, 2017

Conversation Project: Just a Number

Aging and Intergenerational Friendship

Event | October 19, 2017

Conversation Project: What Does It Mean to Be American?

Given the differences of race, ethnicity, place, religion, wealth, language, education, and ideology that exist in the US, what are the things that unite us a nation?

Event | October 11, 2017

Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians

Event | December 18, 2017

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories about Wealth, Status, and Power

What exactly is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation.

Event | January 20, 2018

Conversation Project: Just a Number

Aging and Intergenerational Friendship

Event | April 14, 2018

Conversation Project: What Are You?

Mixed-Race and Interracial Families in Oregon’s Past and Future

Event | March 28, 2018

Conversation Project: Just a Number

Aging and Intergenerational Friendship

Event | September 28, 2017

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Power dynamics influence who benefits from certain cultural experience, and—given the global nature of our world—parts of our individual and cultural identities are shaped by cultures other than our own. How do we make sense of this and what effect does it have on us as individuals and as Oregonians?

Event | October 7, 2017

Conversation Project: What Does It Mean to Be American?

Given the differences of race, ethnicity, place, religion, wealth, language, education, and ideology that exist in the US, what are the things that unite us a nation? How do we understand what it means to be American and what we hold valuable?

Event | November 4, 2017

Conversation Project: Ritual and Ceremony in Modern Life

How do we make meaning out of the big milestones in our personal and community lives?

Event | October 12, 2017

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere?

Event | September 24, 2017

Conversation Project: What Are You?

Mixed-Race and Interracial Families in Oregon’s Past and Future

Event | November 18, 2017

What Is Mine

Editor Kathleen Holt on looking for identity in the post-colonial welter of midcentury Hawaii.

Magazine | August 22, 2017

Your Cultural Attire

Conversations about appropriation sometimes miss the complexity of culture. An article by Zahir Janmohamed

Magazine | August 22, 2017

S'so's Tamales

Sal Sahme writes about finding his spiritual path as a boy on First Mesa.

Magazine | August 22, 2017

Posts

Readers write about Claim

Magazine | August 22, 2017

Conversation Project: What Are You?

Mixed-Race and Interracial Families in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | June 3, 2017

Who is Not at the Table?

Filmmaker Ifanyi Bell reflects on the making of “Future: Portland 2”

This Land | May 18, 2017

Conversation Project: Where Are You from?

Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians

Event | April 26, 2017

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | April 25, 2017

Conversation Project: Understanding Disability

Family and Community Stories

Event | April 19, 2017

Conversation Project: Where Are You from?

Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians

Event | April 13, 2017

Conversation Project: Where Are You from?

Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians

Event | May 2, 2017

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | May 16, 2017

POSTPONED Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation that explores some of the causes of this continued isolation and the differences of experience between Oregonians of different races—such as institutional racism, white privilege, and unconscious bias.

Event | July 13, 2017

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | April 8, 2017

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | April 6, 2017

Conversation Project: What We Want from the Wild

In this conversation, Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis will help participants step back from policy decisions and consider more basic questions about our relationship to the mountains, air, trees, animals, and streams around us. What do we want from nature? What do we understand nature to be, and how do we see ourselves fitting in?

Event | May 3, 2017

Race & Place: Old Town's Chinatown and Japantown through Chinese American and Nikkei Eyes

Chinese and Japanese American elders explore Old Town's multiethnic and multiracial past. This is an Oregon Humanities grant-funded event.

Event | May 3, 2017

Conversation Project: Just a Number

Aging and Intergenerational Friendship

Event | June 6, 2017

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | June 8, 2017

Conversation Project: What We Want from the Wild

Oregonians across the political spectrum place a high value on the diverse natural resources of our state, but we are divided about how these resources should be used and talked about. In this conversation, Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis will help participants step back from policy decisions and consider more basic questions about our relationship to the mountains, air, trees, animals, and streams around us.

Event | June 13, 2017

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Many Oregonians value racial diversity and the dimension and depth it adds to our lives, yet we remain largely isolated from one another and have yet to fulfill the vision of a racially integrated society. Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation that explores some of the causes of this continued isolation and the differences of experience between Oregonians of different races—such as institutional racism, white privilege, and unconscious bias.

Event | June 20, 2017

Conversation Project: Where Are You from?

Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians

Event | May 18, 2017

Good Hair

Going natural despite family and societal expectations. An essay by Kimberly Melton

Magazine | April 4, 2017

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | March 24, 2017

Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians

Event | March 21, 2017

Race & Place: Old Town's Chinatown and Japantown through Chinese American and Nikkei Eyes

Chinese and Japanese American elders explore Old Town's multiethnic and multiracial past. This is an Oregon Humanities grant-funded event.

Event | March 22, 2017

Conversation Project: Understanding Disability

Family and Community Stories

Event | March 16, 2017

Conversation Project: Where Are You from?

Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians

Event | June 25, 2017

Conversation Project: What We Want from the Wild

Oregonians across the political spectrum place a high value on the diverse natural resources of our state, but we are divided about how these resources should be used and talked about. In this conversation, Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis will help participants step back from policy decisions and consider more basic questions about our relationship to the mountains, air, trees, animals, and streams around us.

Event | June 7, 2017

Conversation Project: What Are You?

Mixed-Race and Interracial Families in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | March 5, 2017

Community Forum on Identity and the Use of Race on National Forms

The NAACP Eugene-Springfield Branch hosts a forum about racial identification on government forms. This is an Oregon Humanities grant-funded event.

Event | March 1, 2017

Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

Exploring What Makes Us Oregonians

Event | February 25, 2017

Conversation Project: What's in a Label?

Thinking about Diversity and Racial Categories

Event | February 22, 2017

Race Tool Kit Workshop

Event | February 19, 2017

Conversation Project: What Are You?

Event | February 9, 2017

Conversation Project: Stone Soup

Event | February 9, 2017

Also Fire

Writer Brook Shelley on everyday life as an act of rebellion.

Beyond the Margins | October 26, 2016

Slow Ascent

A Chinese American woman searches for belonging in the country of her grandparents. An essay by Jessica Yen

Magazine | August 11, 2016

A Tremendous Force of Will

A conversation about the Great Migration's and the civil right movement with Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Isabel Wilkerson

Magazine | April 11, 2016

Between Ribbon and Root

Hope and a history of tragedy live together in a Cowlitz woman's son. An essay by Christine Dupres

Magazine | April 11, 2016

Mothers to Daughters

Mothers give advice to their daughters about living bravely in an unsafe world in this film produced by Sika Stanton for Oregon Humanities.

Beyond the Margins | March 7, 2016

Objects in Motion

Editor Kathleen Holt on inertia

Magazine | December 18, 2015

What We Pass On

Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, writes about cultural inheritance.

Magazine | December 18, 2015

This Way through Oregon

Illustrating the systems that move salmon, waste, traffic, and legislation

Magazine | December 18, 2015

So to Speak

Novelist Laila Lalami on moving between languages to find her voice

Magazine | December 18, 2015

All the Same Ocean

Finding the horizon in a life rocked with waves. An essay by Jason Arias

Magazine | December 18, 2015

Trademark Offense

Bandleader Simon Tam explains his fight to trademark his band’s name, “The Slants.” Tam recently argued his case before the US Supreme Court. He won.

Magazine | August 11, 2015

Group Therapy

Copping out at an uptown slumber party. An essay by Dionisia Morales

Magazine | August 11, 2015

The Rim of the Wound

Writer Wendy Willis's open letter to the students of Columbia University Multicultural Affairs Advisory Board, with a special note to her daughters.

Magazine | August 11, 2015

Perhaps, Perhaps

Bobby Arellano on waiting for an alcoholic father to stand up

Magazine | April 7, 2015

Kansas in Technicolor

After a mastectomy, finding beauty in loss. An essay by Gretchen Icenogle

Magazine | April 7, 2015

Resume Usual Activity

Jamie Passaro writes about parenting—and being parented—through mental illness.

Magazine | April 7, 2015

Starting Over

The bumpy repair of a family after a sudden loss. An essay by Melissa Madenski

Beyond the Margins | March 24, 2015

A Temporary Insanity

Torn between the pull of family and the pull of home. An essay by Gail Wells

Beyond the Margins | January 22, 2015

Magazine Podcast: Quandary

Talking about Ferguson, feminism, and filling out forms with Oregon Humanities magazine contributors

Beyond the Margins | December 17, 2014

Messy Business

Editor Kathleen Holt on parenting as performance

Magazine | December 8, 2014

Feel-Good Feminism

Bitch Media cofounder Andi Zeisler wonders if feminism's pop-culture cachet has doomed the movement.

Magazine | December 8, 2014

Boxed In

Writer Wendy Willis ponders which race to check and which people to leave behind when asked about her racial and ethnic background.

Magazine | December 8, 2014

Posts

Readers Write about Quandary

Magazine | December 8, 2014

Another Life

I think often of the taste of my grandfather's grapes and of the meat from my father's knife. An essay by Hanna Neuschwander

Beyond the Margins | November 18, 2014

What's the Use?

Why bother with history? Why bother at all? An essay by Robert Leo Heilman

Beyond the Margins | October 16, 2014

The Bamboo Ceiling

Alex Tizon on how "Orientals" became "Asians." An excerpt from Big Little Man: In Search of My Asian Self

Beyond the Margins | September 15, 2014

Small Man in a Big Country

Native language is just the first thing an immigrant family abandons in order to become American. An excerpt from Little Big Man: In Search of My Asian Self by Alex Tizon

Magazine | July 31, 2014

What's Mine Is Yours

Editor Kathleen Holt on developing a capacity for solitude and a habit of self-reflection in her children

Magazine | March 25, 2014

Mark My Words

Linguist Edwin Battistella on pronouns and the myth of a "me generation"

Magazine | March 25, 2014

In Defense of Navel-Gazing

To understand the world, we must first understand ourselves. An essay by Jay Ponteri

Magazine | March 25, 2014

Trapped in the Spotlight

What happens when quitting your job means quitting yourself? An essay by Courtenay Hameister

Magazine | March 25, 2014

The Thing with Feathers

Joanna Rose on a writer's road trip gone wrong

Magazine | March 25, 2014

You Remind Me of Me

Parent and child, strange and baffling creatures that are part, yet no part, of each other. An essay by Daniel Rivas

Magazine | March 25, 2014

Posts

Readers write about "Me"

Magazine | March 23, 2014

New Again

Magazine | November 15, 2013

A Region by Any Name

From Ecotopia to Cascadia Megaregion, visions of the Pacific Northwest have been secessionist in nature. An essay by Carl Abbott

Magazine | November 8, 2013

Where Are You From?

Connecting to the places where we live. An essay by Wendy Willis

Magazine | November 8, 2013

More Than Skin Deep

Scholar Naomi Zack on the science and social construction of race in America

Magazine | August 9, 2013

One America?

A conversation between Gregory Rodriguez and Tomas Jimenez about American identity, race, immigration, and ideology.

Magazine | August 9, 2013

Being Brown

Bobbie Willis Soeby on when skin lies and when skin tells the truth

Magazine | August 9, 2013

Rodeo City

Pendleton has built its identity around a dogged loyalty to tradition. An essay by Sarah Mirk

Magazine | July 25, 2013

Clinging to the Dream

Why do Americans have such a hard time talking about class? An essay by Leigh van der Werff

Magazine | November 15, 2011

Under God

Frances Bellamy and the origins of the Pledge of Allegiance. By Richard Ellis

Magazine | November 15, 2011

Immobile Dreams

How did the trailer come to be a symbol of failure? An essay by Rebecca Hartman

Magazine | November 15, 2011

The Image and Act of Communion

Editor's note

Magazine | November 8, 2011

Unimaginable Riches

The unfamiliar offers its own rewards. An essay by Joanne Mulcahey

Magazine | November 8, 2011

Laughing Into the Abyss

The existential howl of Jewish American humor. By Scott Nadelson

Magazine | December 5, 2010

Seen Though Not Heard

In the designs on a Klikitat basket, a woman finds an unspoken link to her past. An essay by Christine Dupres

Magazine | March 17, 2010