Showing 55 results for tag Health

Conversation Project: Fair Share

People and businesses expect certain public services—education, transportation, protection, to name a few—and “tax” is the word we use to indicate how we pay for these services. But among taxpayers, areas of frequent and vehement disagreement are what constitutes a needed public service, how much we should pay for those services, and who will be taxed (and how) for them. The conversation, led by facilitator Mary Nolan, will explore the effects—both intended and unintended—of different types of taxes and invite participants to examine and understand their own ideas and their neighbors’ ideas about the best and worst characteristics of local, state, and federal taxes. The admission fee for this conversation is $5. This event will take place in the grange hall.

Event | March 19, 2020

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

What are the stories that shape how we think about growing old? How do we acknowledge the unique differences among aging individuals and separate the true stories from the myths? How do we accept the wisdom of our elders’ experiences while also recognizing new ideas about what it means to age in America? No matter our age, we all hear and tell stories about growing older that reflect our own ideals and fears—and the ideals and fears of our communities. Join facilitator Melissa Madenski as we look at the power of story in a conversation that will ask you to share your own experiences and ideas about aging and listen to the perspectives of others in your community. The admission fee for this event is $5, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds. This event will take place in the grange hall.

Event | May 13, 2020

Conversation Project: Who Are the Deserving Poor?

If you’ve grown up in the United States, chances are you’ve been conditioned to trust that your individual success is earned through hard work. But if this is the case, what do we make of the millions of Americans who struggle with poverty, hunger, and job insecurity? Who is to blame for poverty? What qualities or conditions allow a person to be considered “deserving” of government and community support? Join facilitator Erica Tucker for a conversation that explores our beliefs about poverty and asks us to consider our assumptions about who should—and shouldn’t—be eligible for support.

Event | December 13, 2019

Conversation Project: Talking about Dying

Death is a universal event that transcends many of the differences between us, but it's not something that we have regular opportunities to think and talk about. Oregon Humanities developed the Talking about Dying program to create more public opportunities to reflect on the stories and influences that shape our thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members. Talking about Dying community conversations are free, ninety-minute facilitated discussions geared toward public audiences (ages 15+). During the program, participants talk together about questions such as: What do we want—and not want—at the end of our life? How might our family, culture, religion, and beliefs shape how we think about death? How do access to care, geography, and desires to be remembered affect our decisions about the end of our life?

Event | February 5, 2020

A Body in Motion

Tara L. Campbell on searching for the roots of her daughter's incessant rocking and her own need to stay moving.

Beyond the Margins | July 19, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

What are the stories that shape how we think about growing old? How do we acknowledge the unique differences among aging individuals and separate the true stories from the myths? How do we accept the wisdom of our elders’ experiences while also recognizing new ideas about what it means to age in America? No matter our age, we all hear and tell stories about growing older that reflect our own ideals and fears—and the ideals and fears of our communities. Join facilitator Melissa Madenski as we look at the power of story in a conversation that will ask you to share your own experiences and ideas about aging and listen to the perspectives of others in your community.

Event | October 23, 2019

Conversation Project: Who Are the Deserving Poor?

If you’ve grown up in the United States, chances are you’ve been conditioned to trust that your individual success is earned through hard work. But if this is the case, what do we make of the millions of Americans who struggle with poverty, hunger, and job insecurity? Who is to blame for poverty? What qualities or conditions allow a person to be considered “deserving” of government and community support? Join facilitator Erica Tucker for a conversation that explores our beliefs about poverty and asks us to consider our assumptions about who should—and shouldn’t—be eligible for support.

Event | August 6, 2019

Conversation Project: Who Are the Deserving Poor?

If you’ve grown up in the United States, chances are you’ve been conditioned to trust that your individual success is earned through hard work. But if this is the case, what do we make of the millions of Americans who struggle with poverty, hunger, and job insecurity? Who is to blame for poverty? What qualities or conditions allow a person to be considered “deserving” of government and community support? Join facilitator Erica Tucker for a conversation that explores our beliefs about poverty and asks us to consider our assumptions about who should—and shouldn’t—be eligible for support.

Event | August 7, 2019

Conversation Project: Talking about Dying

Death is a universal event that transcends many of the differences between us, but it's not something that we have regular opportunities to think and talk about. Oregon Humanities developed the Talking about Dying program to create more public opportunities to reflect on the stories and influences that shape our thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members. Talking about Dying community conversations are free, ninety-minute facilitated discussions geared toward public audiences (ages 15+). During the program, participants talk together about questions such as: What do we want—and not want—at the end of our life? How might our family, culture, religion, and beliefs shape how we think about death? How do access to care, geography, and desires to be remembered affect our decisions about the end of our life?

Event | June 27, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

What are the stories that shape how we think about growing old? How do we acknowledge the unique differences among aging individuals and separate the true stories from the myths? How do we accept the wisdom of our elders’ experiences while also recognizing new ideas about what it means to age in America? No matter our age, we all hear and tell stories about growing older that reflect our own ideals and fears—and the ideals and fears of our communities. Join facilitator Melissa Madenski as we look at the power of story in a conversation that will ask you to share your own experiences and ideas about aging and listen to the perspectives of others in your community.

Event | July 10, 2019

The Life We Pay For

Tina Ontiveros writes about the different paths her life and her sister's have taken since their shared childhood experiences of poverty and abandonment.

Magazine | April 29, 2019

Conversation Project: What Makes a Good Tax?

People and businesses expect certain public services—education, transportation, protection, to name a few—and “tax” is the word we use to indicate how we pay for these services. But among taxpayers, areas of frequent and vehement disagreement are what constitutes a needed public service, how much we should pay for those services, and who will be taxed (and how) for them. The conversation, led by facilitator Mary Nolan, will explore the effects—both intended and unintended—of different types of taxes and invite participants to examine and understand their own ideas and their neighbors’ ideas about the best and worst characteristics of local, state, and federal taxes.

Event | May 29, 2019

Conversation Project: Who Are the Deserving Poor?

If you’ve grown up in the United States, chances are you’ve been conditioned to trust that your individual success is earned through hard work. But if this is the case, what do we make of the millions of Americans who struggle with poverty, hunger, and job insecurity? Who is to blame for poverty? What qualities or conditions allow a person to be considered “deserving” of government and community support? Join facilitator Erica Tucker for a conversation that explores our beliefs about poverty and asks us to consider our assumptions about who should—and shouldn’t—be eligible for support.

Event | March 13, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

Stories of Aging in Oregon and Beyond

Event | January 25, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

Stories of Aging in Oregon and Beyond

Event | January 26, 2019

CANCELED: Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

Stories of Aging in Oregon and Beyond

Event | February 10, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

What are the stories that shape how we think about growing old? How do we acknowledge the unique differences among aging individuals and separate the true stories from the myths? How do we accept the wisdom of our elders’ experiences while also recognizing new ideas about what it means to age in America? No matter our age, we all hear and tell stories about growing older that reflect our own ideals and fears—and the ideals and fears of our communities. Join facilitator Melissa Madenski as we look at the power of story in a conversation that will ask you to share your own experiences and ideas about aging and listen to the perspectives of others in your community.

Event | April 13, 2019

Conversation Project: Talking About Dying

Death is a universal event that transcends many of the differences between us, but it's not something that we have regular opportunities to think and talk about. Oregon Humanities developed the Talking about Dying program to create more public opportunities to reflect on the stories and influences that shape our thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members. Talking about Dying community conversations are free, ninety-minute facilitated discussions geared toward public audiences (ages 15+). During the program, participants talk together about questions such as, What do we want—and not want—at the end of our life? How might our family, culture, religion, and beliefs shape how we think about death? How do access to care, geography, and desires to be remembered affect our decisions about the end of our life? Facilitated by Andrea Cano.

Event | May 2, 2019

Our Most-read Stories of 2018

Our readers' favorite articles and videos from the past year explore stories of identity, place, and belonging.

Beyond the Margins | December 13, 2018

Editor's Note: Finite and Unpredictable

Editor Kathleen Holt writes about the settling and unsettling of an aging parent.

Magazine | December 13, 2018

Acceptance

Shilo Niziolek writes about the impact of Marylhurst University's closure on its students.

Beyond the Margins | September 25, 2018

Conversation Project: Who Are the Deserving Poor?

Join facilitator Erica Tucker for a conversation that explores our beliefs about poverty and asks us to consider our assumptions about who should—and shouldn’t—be eligible for support.

Event | October 18, 2018

What Makes a Good Tax?

The conversation, led by facilitator Mary Nolan, will explore the effects—both intended and unintended—of different types of taxes and invite participants to examine and understand their own ideas and their neighbors’ ideas about the best and worst characteristics of local, state, and federal taxes.

Event | September 6, 2018

On Tinnitus

Lucie Bonvalet writes about eight years of living with tinnitus, "a gray veil, a sort of curtain of rain, between me and everything outside of me."

Beyond the Margins | June 15, 2018

Our Neighbors’ Interpretations of the World

Oregon Humanities’ Michelle Patiño-Flores talks with HIP alum Saoírse Bell about literature, activism, and mermaids.

Humanity in Perspective | May 31, 2018

Sixteen in America

Marissa Levy writes about mental illness exacerbated by stresses created by social media and academic pressure.

Beyond the Margins | February 1, 2018

The Third Bullet

Jason Arias on reckoning with abbreviated phrases and abbreviated lives as an EMT.

Magazine | December 15, 2017

The Reflex

Jamie Passaro on searching for the cause of her daughter's debilitating tantrums

Magazine | December 15, 2017

Sarah Schulman: Gentrification of the Mind

A reading, talk, and panel followed by a screening of United in Anger: A History of ACT UP

Event | December 2, 2017

Race and Domestic Violence

Join Adelante Mujeres, Bradley Angle, YWCA of Greater Portland, and Micronesian Islander Community for an evening of poetry, education, and discussion to foster a greater understanding of the significance of race and ethnicity in relationship to domestic violence.

Event | October 26, 2017

What's Brewing?

The Crook County Foundation hosts this public forum on current events and issues happening locally, regionally, and at the state level. This is an Oregon Humanities grant-funded event.

Event | October 18, 2017

My Brother's Keeper: "Unlisted: A Story of Schizophrenia"

This fall, Four Rivers Cultural Center in Ontario will present "My Brother's Keeper," a series of eight documentary film screenings exploring the lives of marginalized peoples and issues such as mental health, addiction, and mass incarceration. Each screening will be followed by a presentation and Q&A session by a local nonprofit or government agency.

Event | October 11, 2017

My Brother's Keeper: "The Anonymous People"

This fall, Four Rivers Cultural Center in Ontario will present "My Brother's Keeper," a series of eight documentary film screenings exploring the lives of marginalized peoples and issues such as mental health, addiction, and mass incarceration. Each screening will be followed by a presentation and Q&A session by a local nonprofit or government agency.

Event | September 27, 2017

My Brother's Keeper: "Emmanuel's Gift"

This fall, Four Rivers Cultural Center in Ontario will present "My Brother's Keeper," a series of eight documentary film screenings exploring the lives of marginalized peoples and issues such as mental health, addiction, and mass incarceration. Each screening will be followed by a presentation and Q&A session by a local nonprofit or government agency.

Event | September 20, 2017

Walk On

An innovative program connects physical activity and memory to improve the health of Portland communities affected by change. An article by Marty Hughley with photos by Tojo Andrianarivo

Magazine | April 5, 2017

Posts

Readers write about Carry

Magazine | April 5, 2017

Uncovered

Writer Donnell Alexander and photographer Kim Nguyen on one undocumented family's long wait for adequate health care

Magazine | August 11, 2016

You'll See Me Tomorrow Because

A prose poem by Anis Mogjani

Beyond the Margins | February 20, 2016

Posts

Readers write about Move

Magazine | December 18, 2015

Plague Fears

Eula Biss writes about how a threat becomes a plague in this excerpt from her book On Immunity.

Magazine | August 11, 2015

Kansas in Technicolor

After a mastectomy, finding beauty in loss. An essay by Gretchen Icenogle

Magazine | April 7, 2015

Resume Usual Activity

Jamie Passaro writes about parenting—and being parented—through mental illness.

Magazine | April 7, 2015

Posts

Magazine | April 7, 2015

Damaged

When disaster strikes, sanity is a matter of degree. An essay by Evelyn Sharenov

Beyond the Margins | February 26, 2015

Are You My Mother?

When a new medication makes the Lois Ruskai Melina's mother more outgoing and impulsive, she must face a choice: Should she have her taken off the drug, even though she likes her better on it?

Magazine | December 8, 2014

Magazine Podcast: Start

Talking about epigenetics, adoption, faith, and clowns with Oregon Humanities magazine contributors

Beyond the Margins | November 5, 2014

Epigenetics and Equity

Zip code may be more important than genetic code when it come's to determining a person's health. A film produced by Dan Sadowsky for Oregon Humanities.

Beyond the Margins | October 7, 2014

Before You Know It

Your health may be determined by stresses experienced by your great-grandparents. How does this change how we plan for the future?

Magazine | July 31, 2014

Trapped in the Spotlight

What happens when quitting your job means quitting yourself? An essay by Courtenay Hameister

Magazine | March 25, 2014

Posts

Readers write about "Me"

Magazine | March 23, 2014

Soldiers' Stories

Photographer Jim Lommasson collaborates with war veterans on a gallery exhibit and book project that look at life for soldiers after returning from Iraq and Afghanistan.

Magazine | November 8, 2013

A Crooked Still Life

An illness, a recovery, and a couple’'s uncertain future. An essay by Margaret Malone

Magazine | November 8, 2013

Gods and the Rest of Us

The perils and burdens of human enhancement. An essay by Mott Greene

Magazine | December 11, 2012

Pursuing the Science of Happiness

In the complicated quest for bliss, the search is the thing. An essay by Andrew Guest

Magazine | December 5, 2010

The Crossing

A two-week journey toward hope and home. By Vicente Martinez.

Magazine | November 23, 2009