Showing 162 results for tag Civic Life

Conversation Project: Faith and Politics in Oregon and Beyond

While faith and politics have long been taboo subjects in polite conversation, it’s no secret that people’s political affiliations and support are often influenced by their faiths. At the same time, faith-based movements, such as the Religious Right of the 1980s, have exhibited great power in political arenas. How do our faith systems influence our political beliefs—and vice versa—today, both in Oregon and nationally? Join writer, educator, and former minister Russ Pierson in a conversation about how our religious ideas and political identities mix and what it means for our common life together. This event will take place in the Program Area.

Event | October 24, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | September 17, 2019

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Many Oregonians have a vision of a future that includes communities built on values of diversity, equity, and inclusion. At the same time, we live in a society that marginalizes and excludes people of color. Facilitators Traci Price and Anita Yap will lead participants in a conversation that looks at how Oregon’s history of racism influences our present and asks, How can understanding Oregon’s historic and current impacts of racism contribute to our sense of place and vision of the future? How can diversity and inclusion create thriving communities?

Event | October 2, 2019

Think & Drink with Desmond Meade

The 2019–20 Think & Drink series, Making Democracy, kicks off with the executive director of the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition.

Think & Drink | August 14, 2019

Think & Drink Portland 2019–20: Making Democracy

Four onstage conversations with activists, writers and civic leaders about how we make decisions together in our communities

Think & Drink | August 8, 2019

Conversation Project: It's a Free Country

Ever heard the expression "America: land of the brave and free" or "It's a free country! I can do what I want"? Maybe you think or say these things yourself. But what does it mean to "be free"? Join Ann Su for a conversation that explores the impact of culture on how we define, value, and experience freedom personally and in community. Participants will discuss different questions: Does everyone have access to freedom in the same way? What choices come with freedom and what are the responsibilities that accompany those choices? How does the concept of "freedom" play out in a diverse, democratic society? A $5 donation is encouraged, but not required to attend this event.

Event | November 12, 2019

Conversation Project: Keeping Tabs on America

Recent revelations about government surveillance, including Edward Snowden’s leak of NSA documents, have renewed worldwide attention to questions around privacy. Why is privacy important? What are the uses of surveillance? What are the dangers? Independent scholar and writer Kristian Williams will lead participants in a conversation about the scope and consequences of government surveillance, as well as ethical and legal limits of surveillance practices.

Event | July 13, 2019

Conversation Project: It's a Free Country

Ever heard the expression "America: land of the brave and free" or "It's a free country! I can do what I want"? Maybe you think or say these things yourself. But what does it mean to "be free"? Join Ann Su for a conversation that explores the impact of culture on how we define, value, and experience freedom personally and in community. Participants will discuss different questions: Does everyone have access to freedom in the same way? What choices come with freedom and what are the responsibilities that accompany those choices? How does the concept of "freedom" play out in a diverse, democratic society?

Event | August 28, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | September 16, 2019

Conversation Project: Crime and Punishment in Oregon

From prisons and youth correctional facilities to schools and county jails, we’re surrounded by institutions that punish. But why do we punish? Why is punishment sometimes sanctioned by the state? Critics of the “prison industrial complex” argue that our methods and scale of punishment are informed by profit, while tough-on-crime policymakers believe that punishment must be meaningful enough to prevent recidivism and ensure public safety. Are there other ways to punish—such as restorative justice—that may be more effective, reasonable, or desirable? Philosopher and writer Monica Mueller facilitates a conversation around these questions and others regarding our motivation, purpose, and methods of punishment.

Event | July 9, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Popular understandings of leadership tell us that leaders look a certain way: they are in charge. They possess outward strength. They are extroverted and act pragmatically rather than emotionally. Perhaps most important, leaders are people in positions of authority and power. Join facilitator Pepe Moscoso for a conversation that explores an alternative view of leadership and asks, When are we leaders in our communities? How can our unique senses of self contribute to our roles as leaders? What do we have to offer that is needed? Participants will have the chance to ask these questions of themselves and to explore with their friends and neighbors what makes a great leader in their communities.

Event | May 9, 2019

Reflections on an Icon

George Estreich writes about finding personal connection in a universal icon.

Magazine | April 29, 2019

Process and Privilege

Cynthia Carmina Gómez writes about how efforts to rename a Portland street for César Chávez faced intense opposition, despite following a process that other petitions were allowed to circumvent.

Magazine | April 29, 2019

Conversation Project: The Meaning of Climate Change

We live in a time of tremendous transformation as the reality of climate change and its effects on our communities become more apparent with every passing year. While there is still much that can and must be done to mitigate the range of impacts climate change might have, we are confronting the certainty of a crisis that will continue to unfold no matter what we do. What is the meaning of this extraordinary moment in human history? The meanings we construct about climate change affect how we think about it, our feelings about it and our willingness to take action. Portland State University instructor David Osborn leads a discussion exploring different meanings of climate change and how our understanding of meaning relates to action. Admission Fee: $5

Event | July 12, 2019

Conversation Project: What Makes a Good Tax?

People and businesses expect certain public services—education, transportation, protection, to name a few—and “tax” is the word we use to indicate how we pay for these services. But among taxpayers, areas of frequent and vehement disagreement are what constitutes a needed public service, how much we should pay for those services, and who will be taxed (and how) for them. The conversation, led by facilitator Mary Nolan, will explore the effects—both intended and unintended—of different types of taxes and invite participants to examine and understand their own ideas and their neighbors’ ideas about the best and worst characteristics of local, state, and federal taxes.

Event | May 29, 2019

Conversation Project: The Meaning of Climate Change

We live in a time of tremendous transformation as the reality of climate change and its effects on our communities become more apparent with every passing year. While there is still much that can and must be done to mitigate the range of impacts climate change might have, we are confronting the certainty of a crisis that will continue to unfold no matter what we do. What is the meaning of this extraordinary moment in human history? The meanings we construct about climate change affect how we think about it, our feelings about it and our willingness to take action. Portland State University instructor David Osborn leads a discussion exploring different meanings of climate change and how our understanding of meaning relates to action.

Event | May 21, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Popular understandings of leadership tell us that leaders look a certain way: they are in charge. They possess outward strength. They are extroverted and act pragmatically rather than emotionally. Perhaps most important, leaders are people in positions of authority and power. Join facilitator Pepe Moscoso for a conversation that explores an alternative view of leadership and asks, When are we leaders in our communities? How can our unique senses of self contribute to our roles as leaders? What do we have to offer that is needed? Participants will have the chance to ask these questions of themselves and to explore with their friends and neighbors what makes a great leader in their communities.

Event | May 15, 2019

Conversation Project: The Meaning of Climate Change

We live in a time of tremendous transformation as the reality of climate change and its effects on our communities become more apparent with every passing year. While there is still much that can and must be done to mitigate the range of impacts climate change might have, we are confronting the certainty of a crisis that will continue to unfold no matter what we do. What is the meaning of this extraordinary moment in human history? The meanings we construct about climate change affect how we think about it, our feelings about it and our willingness to take action. Portland State University instructor David Osborn leads a discussion exploring different meanings of climate change and how our understanding of meaning relates to action.

Event | May 15, 2019

Conversation Project: It's a Free Country

Ever heard the expression "America: land of the brave and free" or "It's a free country! I can do what I want"? Maybe you think or say these things yourself. But what does it mean to "be free"? Join Ann Su for a conversation that explores the impact of culture on how we define, value, and experience freedom personally and in community. Participants will discuss different questions: Does everyone have access to freedom in the same way? What choices come with freedom and what are the responsibilities that accompany those choices? How does the concept of "freedom" play out in a diverse, democratic society?

Event | May 14, 2019

Conversation Project: Hunger in Our Communities

Hunger and its related problems are steadily increasing in the state of Oregon. At the same time, many Oregonians experience pride from living in an area with such abundant and sustainable food production. How can these truths about our state—both the hunger and the abundance—coexist? To understand the root causes of why hunger exists in our communities, we must also look at how we view hunger. Do we see hunger as an individual problem or a systemic one? How does hunger affect our individual identities as well as our sense of community? Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead participants in a conversation to explore the connections between the constructed story of hunger and the current and possible solutions to end hunger.

Event | April 30, 2019

Conversation Project: It's a Free Country

Ever heard the expression "America: land of the brave and free" or "It's a free country! I can do what I want"? Maybe you think or say these things yourself. But what does it mean to "be free"? Join Ann Su for a conversation that explores the impact of culture on how we define, value, and experience freedom personally and in community. Participants will discuss different questions: Does everyone have access to freedom in the same way? What choices come with freedom and what are the responsibilities that accompany those choices? How does the concept of "freedom" play out in a diverse, democratic society?

Event | April 5, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

On both national and local levels, Oregonians have seen how the news can both represent and misrepresent the facts at hand. From debate over local opinions on the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to the discourse around “alternative facts,” it can seem difficult to find current and accurate information to use as we make decisions in our communities. This conversation, led by librarian Kelly McElroy, gives Oregonians a chance to consider their own practices and values around news consumption and find new ways to get the information they need.

Event | April 4, 2019

Conversation Project: Faith and Politics in Oregon and Beyond

While faith and politics have long been taboo subjects in polite conversation, it’s no secret that people’s political affiliations and support are often influenced by their faiths. At the same time, faith-based movements, such as the Religious Right of the 1980s, have exhibited great power in political arenas. How do our faith systems influence our political beliefs—and vice versa—today, both in Oregon and nationally? Join writer, educator, and former minister Russ Pierson in a conversation about how our religious ideas and political identities mix and what it means for our common life together.

Event | March 21, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | February 16, 2019

Returned

Caitlyn May covers the complicated story behind the closure of Douglas County's libraries and their difficult paths to reopening sustainably.

Beyond the Margins | January 31, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | February 16, 2019

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | February 8, 2019

Conversation Project: The Meaning of Climate Change

Portland State University instructor David Osborn leads a discussion exploring different meanings of climate change and how our understanding of meaning relates to action.

Event | January 15, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

How We Find Accurate Information about the World

Event | January 31, 2019

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | February 4, 2019

Conversation Project: Hunger in Our Communities

Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead participants in a conversation to explore the connections between the constructed story of hunger and the current and possible solutions to end hunger.

Event | February 26, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

On both national and local levels, Oregonians have seen how the news can both represent and misrepresent the facts at hand. From debate over local opinions on the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to the discourse around “alternative facts,” it can seem difficult to find current and accurate information to use as we make decisions in our communities. This conversation, led by librarian Kelly McElroy, gives Oregonians a chance to consider their own practices and values around news consumption and find new ways to get the information they need.

Event | March 14, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | May 18, 2019

Listening over Litigation

The High Desert Partnership provides a collaborative vision for Harney County.

Magazine | December 13, 2018

Engagement and Environment

OPAL seeks to bring more voices into conversations about environmental justice.

Magazine | December 13, 2018

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | March 12, 2019

Conversation Project: Hunger in Our Communities

Hunger and its related problems are steadily increasing in the state of Oregon. At the same time, many Oregonians experience pride from living in an area with such abundant and sustainable food production. How can these truths about our state—both the hunger and the abundance—coexist? To understand the root causes of why hunger exists in our communities, we must also look at how we view hunger. Do we see hunger as an individual problem or a systemic one? How does hunger affect our individual identities as well as our sense of community? Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead participants in a conversation to explore the connections between the constructed story of hunger and the current and possible solutions to end hunger.

Event | April 6, 2019

Conversation Project: What Does It Mean to Be American?

The United States is a culturally diverse nation with residents who can trace their heritage to countries across the globe, and our diversity is projected to continue to increase over the next several decades. Given the differences of race, ethnicity, place, religion, wealth, language, education, and ideology that exist in the US, what are the things that unite us a nation? How do we understand what it means to be American and what we hold valuable? Join this conversation led by facilitator Ellen Knutson to share your ideas about what it means to be American and hear others’ ideas, to identify differences and points of connection that may lead us toward the ideal stated in our nation’s motto: E pluribus unum, out of many, one.

Event | April 17, 2019

Conversation Project: Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

On both national and local levels, Oregonians have seen how the news can both represent and misrepresent the facts at hand. From debate over local opinions on the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to the discourse around “alternative facts,” it can seem difficult to find current and accurate information to use as we make decisions in our communities. This conversation, led by librarian Kelly McElroy, gives Oregonians a chance to consider their own practices and values around news consumption and find new ways to get the information they need.

Event | May 1, 2019

POSTPONED: Conversation Project: Hunger in Our Communities

Hunger and its related problems are steadily increasing in the state of Oregon. At the same time, many Oregonians experience pride from living in an area with such abundant and sustainable food production. How can these truths about our state—both the hunger and the abundance—coexist? To understand the root causes of why hunger exists in our communities, we must also look at how we view hunger. Do we see hunger as an individual problem or a systemic one? How does hunger affect our individual identities as well as our sense of community? Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead participants in a conversation to explore the connections between the constructed story of hunger and the current and possible solutions to end hunger.

Event | May 31, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | January 28, 2019

Conversation Project: The Meaning of Climate Change

Portland State University instructor David Osborn leads a discussion exploring different meanings of climate change and how our understanding of meaning relates to action.

Event | February 20, 2019

Conversation Project: It's a Free Country

Ever heard the expression "America: land of the brave and free" or "It's a free country! I can do what I want"? Maybe you think or say these things yourself. But what does it mean to "be free"? Join Ann Su for a conversation that explores the impact of culture on how we define, value, and experience freedom personally and in community. Participants will discuss different questions: Does everyone have access to freedom in the same way? What choices come with freedom and what are the responsibilities that accompany those choices? How does the concept of "freedom" play out in a diverse, democratic society?

Event | March 14, 2019

Educated in Oregon

Kitchen Table Democracy's project Educated in Oregon will explore how storytelling, in the form of short audio stories, creates space for productive conversation about the future of education in Oregon.

Event | November 13, 2018

Educated in Oregon

Kitchen Table Democracy's project Educated in Oregon will explore how storytelling, in the form of short audio stories, creates space for productive conversation about the future of education in Oregon.

Event | November 8, 2018

Fields Artist Fellowship

The Oregon Community Foundation and Oregon Humanities are instituting a significant new fellowship program for emerging to midcareer Oregon-based artists. Beginning in 2019, OCF and OH will work together to award four Fields Artist Fellows $100,000 each over a two-year period.

Collaborative Projects | October 30, 2018

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | December 14, 2018

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | January 17, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

How We Find Accurate Information about the World

Event | October 22, 2018

Conversation Project: Won't You Be My Neighbor?

How Relationships Affect the Places We Live

Event | November 14, 2018

Conversation Project: What Does It Mean to Be American?

Join this conversation led by facilitator Ellen Knutson to share your ideas about what it means to be American and hear others’ ideas, to identify differences and points of connection that may lead us toward the ideal stated in our nation’s motto: E pluribus unum, out of many, one.

Event | November 3, 2018

Conversation Project: How Do Our Values Influence Environmental Policy?

Given competing interests and visions of the public good, how do we protect our common resources such as land, water, and air? Join philosopher Monica Mueller to explore our environmental values and question how those values are reflected—or not reflected—in current local, national, and global environmental policies.

Event | October 16, 2018

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Exploring Nontraditional Community Leadership

Event | October 11, 2018

Think & Drink with Eli Saslow

Join journalist Eli Saslow, author of Rising Out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist for a conversation about how white supremacist movements are born and how they gain power.

Event | October 24, 2018

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before.

Event | September 25, 2018

What Makes a Good Tax?

The conversation, led by facilitator Mary Nolan, will explore the effects—both intended and unintended—of different types of taxes and invite participants to examine and understand their own ideas and their neighbors’ ideas about the best and worst characteristics of local, state, and federal taxes.

Event | September 6, 2018

Conversation Project: Everyday Leaders

Recognizing Leadership Beyond Power and Authority

Event | August 30, 2018

Vanport Mosaic Festival 2018

The 2018 Vanport Mosaic Festival offers six days of memory activism opportunities, commemorating the seventieth anniversary of the Vanport Flood and the fiftieth anniversary of the Fair Housing Act through screenings, live performances, tours, exhibits, and community engagement initiatives

Event | May 26, 2018

Vanport Mosaic Festival 2018

The 2018 Vanport Mosaic Festival offers six days of memory activism opportunities, commemorating the seventieth anniversary of the Vanport Flood and the fiftieth anniversary of the Fair Housing Act through screenings, live performances, tours, exhibits, and community engagement initiatives

Event | May 25, 2018

Vanport Mosaic Festival 2018

The 2018 Vanport Mosaic Festival offers six days of memory activism opportunities, commemorating the seventieth anniversary of the Vanport Flood and the fiftieth anniversary of the Fair Housing Act through screenings, live performances, tours, exhibits, and community engagement initiatives.

Event | May 24, 2018

Vanport Mosaic Festival 2018

The 2018 Vanport Mosaic Festival offers six days of memory activism opportunities, commemorating the seventieth anniversary of the Vanport Flood and the fiftieth anniversary of the Fair Housing Act through screenings, live performances, tours, exhibits, and community engagement initiatives.

Event | May 23, 2018

Exchange and Change

Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, on people listening to one another in Lake County, Oregon

Magazine | April 27, 2018

Albina Rising

Deonna Anderson writes about how a group in Portland is working to undo the harm of urban renewal and heal the wounds of a community.

Magazine | April 27, 2018

Posts

Readers write about Owe

Magazine | April 27, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Facilitators Anita Yap and Traci Price will lead participants in a conversation that looks at how Oregon’s history of racism influences our present and asks, How can understanding historic and current impacts of racism in Oregon contribute to our sense of place and vision of the future?

Event | June 26, 2018

Conversation Project: Ritual and Ceremony in Modern Life

Holly Pruett leads a conversation about the role of ritual and ceremony in participants’ family and cultural histories, the impact of life events that have passed unobserved, and the new ceremonies that people are creating to mark these milestones.

Event | August 15, 2018

Conversation Project: Crime and Punishment in Oregon

This conversation explores why and how we punish and asks, are there other ways that are more effective, reasonable, or desireable?

Event | May 10, 2018

Conversation Project: In Science We Trust?

The Role of Science in a Democracy

Event | April 19, 2018

Conversation Project: In Science We Trust?

The Role of Science in a Democracy

Event | April 18, 2018

Conversation Project: Everyday Leaders

Recognizing Leadership Beyond Power and Authority

Event | April 30, 2018

Bridging Oregon Participant Application Deadline (EXTENDED)

Oregon Humanities is looking for people in Central Oregon to participate in this monthly conversation series.

Event | March 5, 2018

Conversation Project: Everyday Leaders

Recognizing Leadership Beyond Power and Authority

Event | March 29, 2018

Conversation Project: After Obama *POSTPONED*

Talking Race in America Today

Event | February 27, 2018

Conversation Project: Ritual and Ceremony in Modern Life

Holly Pruett, a life-cycle celebrant who works with individuals, families, and communities to commemorate such occasions, leads a conversation about the role of ritual and ceremony in participants’ family and cultural histories and the new ceremonies that people are creating to mark these milestones.

Event | May 19, 2018

Conversation Project: After Obama *POSTPONED*

Talking Race in America Today

Event | February 22, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | March 23, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | May 9, 2018

From the Director: Guns, Tools, and Talk

Adam Davis on the difficulty of talking about guns

Magazine | December 15, 2017

Field Work: Bridging Divides over Dinner

In Bend, residents come together to share meals and conversation.

Magazine | December 15, 2017

Conversation Project: The World to Come

How Our Fear about the Future Affects Our Actions

Event | January 25, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | January 25, 2018

Conversation Project: Ritual and Ceremony in Modern Life

Holly Pruett, a life-cycle celebrant who works with individuals, families, and communities to commemorate such occasions, leads a conversation about the role of ritual and ceremony in participants’ family and cultural histories.

Event | April 19, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | April 20, 2018

On Bearing Bad News

Robert Leo Heilman writes about trying and failing to save library services in Douglas County.

Beyond the Margins | November 21, 2017

Conversation Project: After Obama

Talking Race in America Today

Event | January 7, 2018

Conversation Project: In Science We Trust?

The Role of Science in a Democracy

Event | January 21, 2018

Conversation Project: In Science We Trust?

The Role of Science in a Democracy

Event | January 24, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | February 8, 2018

Conversation Project: The World to Come

How Our Fear about the Future Affects Our Actions

Event | February 28, 2018

Conversation Project: After Obama

Talking Race in America Today

Event | January 16, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | December 7, 2017

Conversation Project: After Obama

Talking Race in America Today

Event | February 17, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | February 15, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | October 26, 2017

Conversation Project: From Saving to Serving

On Intervening in the Lives of Others

Event | January 31, 2018

Conversation Project: From Saving to Serving

On Intervening in the Lives of Others

Event | December 6, 2017

Conversation Project: The World to Come

How Our Fear about the Future Affects Our Actions

Event | February 21, 2018

Growth in Portland: Whose Livability?

Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, moderates a panel discussion on the Portland comprehensive plan.

Event | October 24, 2017

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | May 12, 2018

Conversation Project: After Obama *CANCELLED*

Talking Race in America Today

Event | March 24, 2018

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | November 11, 2017

Conversation Project: The World to Come

How Our Fear about the Future Affects Our Actions

Event | January 10, 2018

History in the News: Whose Monuments? Whose Memory?

Join Willamette Heritage Center for a panel discussion on historical monuments, memory, and the complex history of colonialism, racism, and white supremacist imagery in American culture. This is an Oregon Humanities grant-funded event.

Event | September 21, 2017

Conversation Project: Crime and Punishment in Oregon

From prisons and youth correctional facilities to schools and county jails, we’re surrounded by institutions that punish. But why do we punish? Why is punishment sometimes sanctioned by the state? Are there other ways to punish—such as restorative justice—that may be more effective, reasonable, or desirable?

Event | November 15, 2017

Conversation Project: After Obama

Talking Race in America Today

Event | October 17, 2017

Conversation Project: Race and Place

Racism and Resilience in Oregon's Past and Future

Event | December 16, 2017

Conversation Project: Ritual and Ceremony in Modern Life

How do we make meaning out of the big milestones in our personal and community lives?

Event | October 12, 2017

Conversation Project: From Saving to Serving

On Intervening in the Lives of Others

Event | September 7, 2017

Conversation Project: In Science We Trust?

The Role of Science in a Democracy

Event | May 16, 2018

Invite in the Stranger

Adam Davis on radical hospitality

Magazine | August 22, 2017

You Are Being Watched

The United States’ long history of turning citizens against one another. An excerpt from Joshua Reeves' Citizen Spies: The Long Rise of America’s Surveillance Society, reprinted with permission from New York University Press.

Magazine | August 22, 2017

PLAYA Presents

Current PLAYA residents ask, How can the art we make and the technology we devise feed the needs of our own community? This is an Oregon Humanities grant-funded event.

Event | August 19, 2017

History in the News: Should Historians Be Pundits?

Recent editorials in the New York Times, The Atlantic, and The Washington Post have raised questions about whether and how historians ought to opine on current events and political issues. Are historians supposed to be apolitical? How should historians engage in political debate—if at all? This event is funded in part by a grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | July 20, 2017

Conversation Project: Homeless in the Land of Plenty

How does homelessness affect the lives of all people within a community? What does it mean for there to be masses of people who are not adequately housed? Join storyteller Ryan Stroud to share your stories and learn about the experiences of others.

Event | July 19, 2017

The Numbers

As Portland's urban core has gentrified, thousands of residents have been displaced to neighborhoods east of 82nd Avenue, an area that locals call "The Numbers." In this video, young people living in The Numbers talk about their hopes for their community.

This Land | May 10, 2017

Conversation Project: Life after War

Photography and Oral Histories of Coming Home

Event | May 31, 2017

Conversation Project: Looking for Leadership *CANCELED*

What Do We Want from Leaders? This event has been canceled and will be rescheduled to a later date.

Event | April 18, 2017

Conversation Project: Life after War

Photography and Oral Histories of Coming Home

Event | April 15, 2017

Conversation Project: Homeless in the Land of Plenty

How does homelessness affect the lives of all people within a community? What does it mean for there to be masses of people who are not adequately housed? Join storyteller Ryan Stroud to share your stories and learn about the experiences of others.

Event | May 18, 2017

Conversation Project: From Saving to Serving

On Intervening in the Lives of Others

Event | April 5, 2017

Conversation Project: Life after War

Photography and Oral Histories of Coming Home

Event | May 4, 2017

Conversation Project: Are International Trade Agreements Good for Oregon?

Oregonians have been active and vocal participants in global debates over trade since the creation of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). Lawyer and researcher Michael Fakhri will lead participants in a conversation about how we assess the value of international trade agreements.

Event | May 12, 2017

Conversation Project: A World without Secrets

Privacy and Expectations in the US

Event | May 30, 2017

Conversation Project: Homeless in the Land of Plenty

How does homelessness affect the lives of all people within a community? What does it mean for there to be masses of people who are not adequately housed? Join storyteller Ryan Stroud to share your stories and learn about the experiences of others.

Event | July 29, 2017

Conversation Project: In Science We Trust?

The Role of Science in a Democracy

Event | April 1, 2017

Conversation Project: In Science We Trust?

The Role of Science in a Democracy

Event | March 22, 2017

Conversation Project: Homeless in the Land of Plenty

How does homelessness affect the lives of all people within a community? What does it mean for there to be masses of people who are not adequately housed? Join storyteller Ryan Stroud to share your stories and learn about the experiences of others.

Event | July 16, 2017

Conversation Project: Looking for Leadership

What Do We Want from Leaders?

Event | March 7, 2017

Conversation Project: The Purpose of Prison

What is Punishment for?

Event | February 24, 2017

Conversation Project: Life after War

Photography and Oral Histories of Coming Home

Event | February 19, 2017

Conversation Project: Life after War

Photography and Oral Histories of Coming Home

Event | May 3, 2017

King Tide

An excerpt from Micah White's book, The End of Protest: A New Playbook for the Revolution

Magazine | December 6, 2016

The Longest of Long Shots

A Sanders delegate's brush with national party politics. An essay by Valdez Bravo

Magazine | December 6, 2016

Feeling It All

Oregon Humanities magazine editor Kathleen Holt on the complicated and blurry lines between private rights and public good

Magazine | August 11, 2016

Stolen Land and Borrowed Dollars

Creative resistance bloomed in the lead up to the Vancouver Olympics. An excerpt from Power Games: A Political History of the Olympics by Jules Boykoff

Magazine | April 11, 2016

My North Star

How Mumia Abu-Jamal Led Me to Activism. An essay by Walidah Imarisha

Beyond the Margins | November 24, 2015

Plague Fears

Eula Biss writes about how a threat becomes a plague in this excerpt from her book On Immunity.

Magazine | August 11, 2015

Future: Portland

Civic leaders describe the loss of Portland's strong black communities and the hope of restoring them in the future in a video by Ifanyi Bell.

Beyond the Margins | March 9, 2015

Posts

Readers Write about Quandary

Magazine | December 8, 2014

Who's Minding Your Business?

A conversation with writer William T. Vollmann on privacy, surveillance, and hope

Magazine | March 25, 2014

Into the Welter

Editor Kathleen Holt on cities as more than just places

Magazine | December 5, 2013

This Land Planned for You and Me

J. David Santen Jr. on what Oregon's communities look like forty years after the passage of Senate Bill 100

Magazine | December 5, 2013

Imaginary Metropolis

What do the cities of science fiction books and films say about the way we perceive the cities we live in? An essay by Dan DeWeese

Magazine | December 5, 2013

Design for a Crowded Planet

Cynthia E. Smith, the curator of socially responsible design at the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewett design museum, talks about innovative solutions by and for city dwellers.

Magazine | December 5, 2013

Firing a Friend

It's hard to be a good citizen during an election year. An essay by Jennifer Ruth

Magazine | November 15, 2013

A Century of War

Writer and historian Andrew Bacevich on changing the way Americans think about war

Magazine | November 8, 2013

Against Custom

The first peace advocates imagined a new story for the United States. An essay by Margot Minardi

Magazine | November 8, 2013

The Good Fight

Can letting our children roughhouse lead to a better democracy? An essay by Sarah Gilbert

Magazine | November 8, 2013

Water Wars

Journalist J. David Santen Jr. on how battles, compromises, and resolutions abound in a state flush with water.

Magazine | November 8, 2013

A Hidden History

Walidah Imarisha on revealing the stories and struggles of Oregon’s African American communities.

Magazine | August 13, 2013

One America?

A conversation between Gregory Rodriguez and Tomas Jimenez about American identity, race, immigration, and ideology.

Magazine | August 9, 2013

Unforgiven, Unforgotten

A month before Barack Obama was elected president of the United States, I ensnared myself in stupid, late-night hijinks that landed me on front pages nationwide and nearly in prison in the rural Midwest.

Magazine | July 25, 2013

That Public Thing

What jazz can teach us about being a community. An essay by Tim DuRoche

Magazine | November 15, 2011

Love Thy Neighbor (Sometimes)

A close-knit neighborhood can make us happy, but it can also add to the busy-ness of daily life. An essay by Jamie Passaro

Magazine | December 5, 2010

The Working Class

Bette Lynch Husted argues that hard times are good times to rethink our attitudes about the fungibility of workers.

Magazine | August 10, 2010