Showing 88 results for tag Education

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation with Jennifer Burns Bright investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life.

Event | November 2, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation with Jennifer Burns Bright investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life. This event will take place in the Sprague Room.

Event | November 6, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation with Jennifer Burns Bright investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life. This event will take place in the Flora Room.

Event | October 26, 2019

Conversation Project: Live to Work or Work to Live?

Most adults spend most of their waking hours working. Yet, we rarely have the time to consider why certain work brings us satisfaction and other work does not. Do our jobs define our personal success? Are some jobs more valuable than others? How do jobs contribute to national success or failure? This conversation, led by historian Nikki Mandell, will engage participants in thinking about and discussing work more deeply. Participants will explore the quality and meanings of work in their own lives and those of people different from themselves and the connections between work as a personal endeavor and jobs as part of local and national economies. This conversation can be adapted to the needs and goals of the host organization and group of participants.

Event | September 10, 2019

Neither Here nor There

Kiki Nakamura-Koyama writes about her struggle to fit in across continents and how she is empowered to change that experience for her students.

Beyond the Margins | August 30, 2019

Humanity in Perspective

A free college humanities course for adults who face financial barriers to continuing their education.

Humanity in Perspective | August 9, 2019

Meet Our Instructors

Meet the instructors who teach Humanity in Perspective.

Humanity in Perspective | August 9, 2019

Moving Toward a Culture of Consent

Sexual violence is an epidemic that has plagued our communities and gone unaddressed for too long. Within the past year, sexual assault has come to the forefront of the media with the #Metoo movement and political upheaval around the Kavanaugh hearings. The Sexual Assault Resource Center's support line saw an increase in calls of over 166 percent in the week of the Kavanaugh hearings. People need a safe space to discuss sexual violence and move toward its prevention. This program seeks to provide that space with guided discussion around the issues at the root of sexual violence: oppression, gender roles, stigma, and romance. This program is supported by a Public Program Grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | August 14, 2019

Moving Toward a Culture of Consent

Sexual violence is an epidemic that has plagued our communities and gone unaddressed for too long. Within the past year, sexual assault has come to the forefront of the media with the #Metoo movement and political upheaval around the Kavanaugh hearings. The Sexual Assault Resource Center's support line saw an increase in calls of over 166 percent in the week of the Kavanaugh hearings. People need a safe space to discuss sexual violence and move toward its prevention. This program seeks to provide that space with guided discussion around the issues at the root of sexual violence: oppression, gender roles, stigma, and romance. This program is supported by a Public Program Grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | August 15, 2019

Moving Toward a Culture of Consent

Sexual violence is an epidemic that has plagued our communities and gone unaddressed for too long. Within the past year, sexual assault has come to the forefront of the media with the #Metoo movement and political upheaval around the Kavanaugh hearings. The Sexual Assault Resource Center's support line saw an increase in calls of over 166 percent in the week of the Kavanaugh hearings. People need a safe space to discuss sexual violence and move toward its prevention. This program seeks to provide that space with guided discussion around the issues at the root of sexual violence: oppression, gender roles, stigma, and romance. This program is supported by a Public Program Grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | August 13, 2019

Moving Toward a Culture of Consent

Sexual violence is an epidemic that has plagued our communities and gone unaddressed for too long. Within the past year, sexual assault has come to the forefront of the media with the #Metoo movement and political upheaval around the Kavanaugh hearings. The Sexual Assault Resource Center's support line saw an increase in calls of over 166 percent in the week of the Kavanaugh hearings. People need a safe space to discuss sexual violence and move toward its prevention. This program seeks to provide that space with guided discussion around the issues at the root of sexual violence: oppression, gender roles, stigma, and romance. This program is supported by a Public Program Grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | August 11, 2019

Moving Toward a Culture of Consent

Sexual violence is an epidemic that has plagued our communities and gone unaddressed for too long. Within the past year, sexual assault has come to the forefront of the media with the #Metoo movement and political upheaval around the Kavanaugh hearings. The Sexual Assault Resource Center's support line saw an increase in calls of over 166 percent in the week of the Kavanaugh hearings. People need a safe space to discuss sexual violence and move toward its prevention. This program seeks to provide that space with guided discussion around the issues at the root of sexual violence: oppression, gender roles, stigma, and romance. This program is supported by a Public Program Grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | August 12, 2019

Conversation Project: Keeping Tabs on America

Recent revelations about government surveillance, including Edward Snowden’s leak of NSA documents, have renewed worldwide attention to questions around privacy. Why is privacy important? What are the uses of surveillance? What are the dangers? Independent scholar and writer Kristian Williams will lead participants in a conversation about the scope and consequences of government surveillance, as well as ethical and legal limits of surveillance practices.

Event | July 13, 2019

Drill

Dan Falkner writes about searching for a solution at a training for teachers on responding to school shootings.

Magazine | April 29, 2019

Stand

A student reckons with an inappropriate teacher’s power and her own powerlessness. An excerpt from Reema Zaman's memoir, I Am Yours.

Magazine | April 29, 2019

Meaningful Moves

Magazine | April 29, 2019

Editor's Note: Pushing Forward, Holding Back

Kathleen Holt writes about seeing herself reflected in her son's fierce passions.

Magazine | April 29, 2019

Grant Funded Event: Public Showing of "Circles" Film Followed by Discussion

Resolutions Northwest presents a screening of Circles, a documentary by Cassidy Friedman about the restorative justice work done by Eric Butler, a school counselor in Oakland, California. The screening will be followed by a facilitated discussion that will give parents, educators, and activists who are working toward transformative justice, on small and large scales, an adaptable blueprint to apply in their own lives and in schools. This event is made possible in part by a responsive program grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | May 30, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life.

Event | May 28, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life.

Event | May 1, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | April 22, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | May 2, 2019

Conversation Project: Listening to Young People

What does it look like when adults really listen to young people? Cultural beliefs about young people perpetuate myths that cause harm, especially when combined with laws that control their physical and emotional autonomy and limit their ability to participate in public life. Young people experiencing marginalization for any reason—race, gender, sexuality, ability—also have the added layer of not being taken seriously because of their age. And yet the history of social justice movements in the United States is deeply connected to young people’s agency, autonomy, and power. Join facilitator Emily Squires for a conversation that asks folks to explore their own beliefs about what it means to be young and to reflect on their individual relationship to power as it relates to age.

Event | May 1, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | April 28, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

On both national and local levels, Oregonians have seen how the news can both represent and misrepresent the facts at hand. From debate over local opinions on the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to the discourse around “alternative facts,” it can seem difficult to find current and accurate information to use as we make decisions in our communities. This conversation, led by librarian Kelly McElroy, gives Oregonians a chance to consider their own practices and values around news consumption and find new ways to get the information they need.

Event | April 4, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life.

Event | June 4, 2019

Conversation Project: Does Higher Education Matter?

Higher education is considered essential for individuals seeking employment opportunities, social and cultural advancement, and a more secure financial future. No matter your background or privilege, a college degree is automatically assumed to multiply your opportunities. But in the current cycles of escalating tuition costs, ballooning student loan debt, and a crumbling secondary education infrastructure in Oregon, we have an increasing need to examine the purposefulness and meaningfulness of higher education in our day-to-day lives. Join educator and activist Paul Susi in a discussion that will examine our assumptions and values around education and its impact on our lives.

Event | March 5, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | April 25, 2019

Conversation Project: White Allyship in Close-knit Communities

In this conversation led by facilitator Alexis James, participants will have the chance to explore their identities, learn how to acknowledge different lived experiences without alienating friends and neighbors, and move toward action in their own communities.

Event | February 7, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Self-sufficiency and American Life

Event | January 9, 2019

Conversation Project: What's the Purpose of Public Education?

Join facilitator Aimee Craig for a conversation that explores the extent to which our various—and sometimes conflicting—ideals about the purpose of public education align with what is happening in our schools.

Event | January 25, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

How We Find Accurate Information about the World

Event | January 31, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Self-sufficiency and American Life

Event | February 7, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Self-sufficiency and American Life

Event | March 1, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | March 12, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

On both national and local levels, Oregonians have seen how the news can both represent and misrepresent the facts at hand. From debate over local opinions on the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to the discourse around “alternative facts,” it can seem difficult to find current and accurate information to use as we make decisions in our communities. This conversation, led by librarian Kelly McElroy, gives Oregonians a chance to consider their own practices and values around news consumption and find new ways to get the information they need.

Event | March 14, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life.

Event | March 25, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life.

Event | March 26, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | April 4, 2019

Conversation Project: Listening to Young People

What does it look like when adults really listen to young people? Cultural beliefs about young people perpetuate myths that cause harm, especially when combined with laws that control their physical and emotional autonomy and limit their ability to participate in public life. Young people experiencing marginalization for any reason—race, gender, sexuality, ability—also have the added layer of not being taken seriously because of their age. And yet the history of social justice movements in the United States is deeply connected to young people’s agency, autonomy, and power. Join facilitator Emily Squires for a conversation that asks folks to explore their own beliefs about what it means to be young and to reflect on their individual relationship to power as it relates to age. This event will take place in the Wilson High School Library

Event | April 18, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

Event | March 15, 2019

Conversation Project: What We Owe

Debt has bound people together and driven them apart for millennia. Oppressive debt has played a role in major social revolutions that have resulted in the clearing of debt records, yet there are other debts, like the cost of being born, for which many could not imagine demanding repayment. In the past ten years, US national debt and personal debt have reached all-time highs—levels at which full repayment may seem implausible. But is repayment even necessary? Join educator April Slabosheski in a conversation that asks, What constitutes debt? How does debt shape the way we relate to one another? How do we decide which debts we will repay, and which we will not?

Event | April 11, 2019

Conversation Project: Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

On both national and local levels, Oregonians have seen how the news can both represent and misrepresent the facts at hand. From debate over local opinions on the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to the discourse around “alternative facts,” it can seem difficult to find current and accurate information to use as we make decisions in our communities. This conversation, led by librarian Kelly McElroy, gives Oregonians a chance to consider their own practices and values around news consumption and find new ways to get the information they need.

Event | May 1, 2019

Conversation Project: Listening to Young People

What does it look like when adults really listen to young people? Cultural beliefs about young people perpetuate myths that cause harm, especially when combined with laws that control their physical and emotional autonomy and limit their ability to participate in public life. Young people experiencing marginalization for any reason—race, gender, sexuality, ability—also have the added layer of not being taken seriously because of their age. And yet the history of social justice movements in the United States is deeply connected to young people’s agency, autonomy, and power. Join facilitator Emily Squires for a conversation that asks folks to explore their own beliefs about what it means to be young and to reflect on their individual relationship to power as it relates to age.

Event | April 13, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Self-sufficiency and American Life

Event | January 12, 2019

My Name

Sravya Tadepalli writes about her experiences with people mispronouncing her name.

Beyond the Margins | November 29, 2018

Talking about Sex

A conversation with Conversation Project facilitator Emily Squires on how we talk about sex in our school system.

Beyond the Margins | November 19, 2018

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Self-sufficiency and American Life

Event | January 10, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life.

Event | April 30, 2019

Educated in Oregon

Kitchen Table Democracy's project Educated in Oregon will explore how storytelling, in the form of short audio stories, creates space for productive conversation about the future of education in Oregon.

Event | November 13, 2018

Educated in Oregon

Kitchen Table Democracy's project Educated in Oregon will explore how storytelling, in the form of short audio stories, creates space for productive conversation about the future of education in Oregon.

Event | November 8, 2018

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children?

Event | December 13, 2018

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Self-sufficiency and American Life

Event | January 11, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

How We Find Accurate Information about the World

Event | October 22, 2018

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children?

Event | October 18, 2018

Acceptance

Shilo Niziolek writes about the impact of Marylhurst University's closure on its students.

Beyond the Margins | September 25, 2018

Conversation Project: Does Higher Education Matter?

Join educator and activist Paul Susi in a discussion that will examine our assumptions and values around education and its impact on our lives.​​​​​​​

Event | November 8, 2018

Conversation Project: What's the Purpose of Public Education?

Join facilitator Aimee Craig for a conversation that explores the extent to which our various—and sometimes conflicting—ideals about the purpose of public education align with what is happening in our schools.

Event | October 24, 2018

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children? This event will be held in Spanish

Event | October 16, 2018

Conversation Project: How Do Our Values Influence Environmental Policy?

Given competing interests and visions of the public good, how do we protect our common resources such as land, water, and air? Join philosopher Monica Mueller to explore our environmental values and question how those values are reflected—or not reflected—in current local, national, and global environmental policies.

Event | October 16, 2018

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children?

Event | October 20, 2018

Our Neighbors’ Interpretations of the World

Oregon Humanities’ Michelle Patiño-Flores talks with HIP alum Saoírse Bell about literature, activism, and mermaids.

Humanity in Perspective | May 31, 2018

Expanding East

Oregon Humanities partners with Rosewood Initiative and Alder College to offer Humanity in Perspective courses in East Portland.

Magazine | April 27, 2018

Buying Time

Wendy N. Wagner on what we owe our children

Magazine | April 27, 2018

Read. Talk. Think.

Things that make you say “O. Hm.” from Oregon Humanities people and programs, and new books by Oregon authors

Magazine | April 27, 2018

2018 Humanity in Perspective Commencement

A commencement ceremony to celebrate the graduating Humanity in Perspective class.

Event | April 28, 2018

Conversation Project: Does Higher Education Matter?

Join educator and activist Paul Susi in a discussion that will examine our assumptions and values around education and its impact on our lives.

Event | June 4, 2018

Conversation Project: Does Higher Education Matter?

Join educator and activist Paul Susi in a discussion that will examine our assumptions and values around education and its impact on our lives.

Event | March 11, 2018

Sixteen in America

Marissa Levy writes about mental illness exacerbated by stresses created by social media and academic pressure.

Beyond the Margins | February 1, 2018

Posts

Readers write about Harm

Magazine | December 15, 2017

An (Underground) American DREAMer: From Undocumented to Wall Street to Immigration Advocacy

A keynote address by immigration and education rights advocate Julissa Arce. This program is made possible in part by a Responsive Program Grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | February 6, 2018

Season of Nonviolence: A Conversation with Julissa Arce

In commemoration of the Season of Nonviolence, immigration and education rights advocate Julissa Arce will use her inspirational story to change the conversation around immigration. This program is made possible in part by a Responsive Program Grant from Oregon Humanities.

Event | February 7, 2018

Conversation Project: Does Higher Education Matter?

This conversation will examine our assumptions and values around education and its impact on our lives.

Event | April 19, 2018

My Brother's Keeper: "Papers: Stories of Undocumented Youth"

This fall, Four Rivers Cultural Center in Ontario will present "My Brother's Keeper," a series of eight documentary film screenings exploring the lives of marginalized peoples and issues such as mental health, addiction, and mass incarceration. Each screening will be followed by a presentation and Q&A session by a local nonprofit or government agency.

Event | September 13, 2017

More to the Story

A grade-school musical offers educators and students a chance to reexamine history. An article by Marty Hughley with photos by Fred Joe

Magazine | August 22, 2017

Remembering Peter Sears

We were saddened to learn of the death of former Oregon Poet Laureate Peter Sears, who passed away July 20.

Beyond the Margins | July 25, 2017

All Our Voices

Mary Thompson, a 2016 graduate of Humanity in Perspective—a college humanities course for adults facing barriers to their education—shares what the program has meant to her and what she hopes for the future in her address to the 2017 graduating class.

Humanity in Perspective | May 3, 2017

Life Lessons

Humanity in Perspective graduate says education is about more than just writing and reading.

Humanity in Perspective | April 11, 2017

2017 Humanity in Perspective Commencement

A commencement ceremony to celebrate the graduating Humanity in Perspective class.

Event | April 29, 2017

Taking the Lead

We partnered with Catlin-Gabel’s PLACE program to train high school students to lead community conversations. Filmmaker Sika Stanton asks these emerging leaders from North Portland about how they hope to use their new skills.

Beyond the Margins | November 2, 2016

In the Land of the New

Mexican immigrants find home in el nuevo South. An excerpt from Translation Nation by Héctor Tobar

Beyond the Margins | March 29, 2016

Whose State Is This?

Journalist Brent Walth on how legal measures targeting Latino Oregonians reflect fears of change.

Magazine | December 18, 2015

My North Star

How Mumia Abu-Jamal Led Me to Activism. An essay by Walidah Imarisha

Beyond the Margins | November 24, 2015

The Rim of the Wound

Writer Wendy Willis's open letter to the students of Columbia University Multicultural Affairs Advisory Board, with a special note to her daughters.

Magazine | August 11, 2015

On the Bench

Not starting and starting again. An essay by Brian Doyle

Magazine | July 31, 2014

Posts

Readers write about "Me"

Magazine | March 23, 2014

Résumé of Failures

The stories of struggle, insecurity, and loss behind a successful writer’'s accomplishments. By Kim Stafford

Magazine | April 4, 2011

Second Opinions

Camela Raymond asks economists, activists, public officials, and financiers for advice for Oregon's ailing economy.

Magazine | August 10, 2010