Showing 76 results for tag Economics

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | September 17, 2019

Conversation Project: Live to Work or Work to Live?

Most adults spend most of their waking hours working. Yet, we rarely have the time to consider why certain work brings us satisfaction and other work does not. Do our jobs define our personal success? Are some jobs more valuable than others? How do jobs contribute to national success or failure? This conversation, led by historian Nikki Mandell, will engage participants in thinking about and discussing work more deeply. Participants will explore the quality and meanings of work in their own lives and those of people different from themselves and the connections between work as a personal endeavor and jobs as part of local and national economies. This conversation can be adapted to the needs and goals of the host organization and group of participants.

Event | September 10, 2019

Conversation Project: Who Are the Deserving Poor?

If you’ve grown up in the United States, chances are you’ve been conditioned to trust that your individual success is earned through hard work. But if this is the case, what do we make of the millions of Americans who struggle with poverty, hunger, and job insecurity? Who is to blame for poverty? What qualities or conditions allow a person to be considered “deserving” of government and community support? Join facilitator Erica Tucker for a conversation that explores our beliefs about poverty and asks us to consider our assumptions about who should—and shouldn’t—be eligible for support.

Event | August 6, 2019

Conversation Project: Who Are the Deserving Poor?

If you’ve grown up in the United States, chances are you’ve been conditioned to trust that your individual success is earned through hard work. But if this is the case, what do we make of the millions of Americans who struggle with poverty, hunger, and job insecurity? Who is to blame for poverty? What qualities or conditions allow a person to be considered “deserving” of government and community support? Join facilitator Erica Tucker for a conversation that explores our beliefs about poverty and asks us to consider our assumptions about who should—and shouldn’t—be eligible for support.

Event | August 7, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | September 16, 2019

Conversation Project: Crime and Punishment in Oregon

From prisons and youth correctional facilities to schools and county jails, we’re surrounded by institutions that punish. But why do we punish? Why is punishment sometimes sanctioned by the state? Critics of the “prison industrial complex” argue that our methods and scale of punishment are informed by profit, while tough-on-crime policymakers believe that punishment must be meaningful enough to prevent recidivism and ensure public safety. Are there other ways to punish—such as restorative justice—that may be more effective, reasonable, or desirable? Philosopher and writer Monica Mueller facilitates a conversation around these questions and others regarding our motivation, purpose, and methods of punishment.

Event | July 9, 2019

Conversation Project: Fish Tales

Oregonians love the wild beauty of our 363 miles of coastline, but finding truly local seafood can be hard, even on the coast. The US imports approximately 90 percent of its seafood and ships out nearly as much to the global market. Why aren’t we eating more local seafood, now that preserving and distribution technologies are the most sophisticated they have ever been? Why do we consider seafood more a delicacy now than it has been in the past? In this conversation, food writer Jennifer Burns Bright helps participants explore our relationship with the products of the sea and cultural traditions involving fishing, eating seafood, and understanding the ocean’s bounty and challenges.

Event | May 29, 2019

The Life We Pay For

Tina Ontiveros writes about the different paths her life and her sister's have taken since their shared childhood experiences of poverty and abandonment.

Magazine | April 29, 2019

Conversation Project: Sharing Our Lives with Animals

Whether we find ourselves on farms or ranches, in cities, or in other places between, our lives are entangled with the lives of other species. Our experiences with domestic animals—in particular those considered pets or livestock—affect the ways we understand relationships with them, who we value and depend upon in wildly different ways. As scientific research and broader cultural shifts challenge common notions about the intelligence and emotional lives of other beings, we face complex quandaries of how to respectfully recognize and care for the needs of domestic companions. For this conversation, artist and educator Karin Bolender Hart invites us to share our own animal stories, consider how our personal experiences and beliefs about the lives of animals shape the stories we tell, and reflect on how these stories in turn affect our choices as caretakers, farmers, consumers, and companions.

Event | April 27, 2019

Conversation Project: What We Owe

Debt has bound people together and driven them apart for millennia. Oppressive debt has played a role in major social revolutions that have resulted in the clearing of debt records, yet there are other debts, like the cost of being born, for which many could not imagine demanding repayment. In the past ten years, US national debt and personal debt have reached all-time highs—levels at which full repayment may seem implausible. But is repayment even necessary? Join educator April Slabosheski in a conversation that asks, What constitutes debt? How does debt shape the way we relate to one another? How do we decide which debts we will repay, and which we will not?

Event | May 1, 2019

Conversation Project: What Makes a Good Tax?

People and businesses expect certain public services—education, transportation, protection, to name a few—and “tax” is the word we use to indicate how we pay for these services. But among taxpayers, areas of frequent and vehement disagreement are what constitutes a needed public service, how much we should pay for those services, and who will be taxed (and how) for them. The conversation, led by facilitator Mary Nolan, will explore the effects—both intended and unintended—of different types of taxes and invite participants to examine and understand their own ideas and their neighbors’ ideas about the best and worst characteristics of local, state, and federal taxes.

Event | May 29, 2019

Conversation Project: Hunger in Our Communities

Hunger and its related problems are steadily increasing in the state of Oregon. At the same time, many Oregonians experience pride from living in an area with such abundant and sustainable food production. How can these truths about our state—both the hunger and the abundance—coexist? To understand the root causes of why hunger exists in our communities, we must also look at how we view hunger. Do we see hunger as an individual problem or a systemic one? How does hunger affect our individual identities as well as our sense of community? Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead participants in a conversation to explore the connections between the constructed story of hunger and the current and possible solutions to end hunger.

Event | April 30, 2019

Conversation Project: Seeing the Forest and the Trees

We live in a state with abundant forests, and yet we don’t all see the same thing when we look into the woods. Oregon is known for both its timber industry and its deep environmental values. For many decades now management of our public forests has made headlines and driven apart neighbors. Facilitator Mariah Acton will lead this conversation to explore the values, identities, and beliefs we each have about our forests and what we, as a state, do to steward, manage, and protect this special resource.

Event | April 11, 2019

Conversation Project: Who Are the Deserving Poor?

If you’ve grown up in the United States, chances are you’ve been conditioned to trust that your individual success is earned through hard work. But if this is the case, what do we make of the millions of Americans who struggle with poverty, hunger, and job insecurity? Who is to blame for poverty? What qualities or conditions allow a person to be considered “deserving” of government and community support? Join facilitator Erica Tucker for a conversation that explores our beliefs about poverty and asks us to consider our assumptions about who should—and shouldn’t—be eligible for support.

Event | March 13, 2019

Conversation Project: Sharing Our Lives with Animals

Whether we find ourselves on farms or ranches, in cities, or in other places between, our lives are entangled with the lives of other species. Our experiences with domestic animals—in particular those considered pets or livestock—affect the ways we understand relationships with them, who we value and depend upon in wildly different ways. As scientific research and broader cultural shifts challenge common notions about the intelligence and emotional lives of other beings, we face complex quandaries of how to respectfully recognize and care for the needs of domestic companions. For this conversation, artist and educator Karin Bolender Hart invites us to share our own animal stories, consider how our personal experiences and beliefs about the lives of animals shape the stories we tell, and reflect on how these stories in turn affect our choices as caretakers, farmers, consumers, and companions.

Event | March 14, 2019

Conversation Project: Does Higher Education Matter?

Higher education is considered essential for individuals seeking employment opportunities, social and cultural advancement, and a more secure financial future. No matter your background or privilege, a college degree is automatically assumed to multiply your opportunities. But in the current cycles of escalating tuition costs, ballooning student loan debt, and a crumbling secondary education infrastructure in Oregon, we have an increasing need to examine the purposefulness and meaningfulness of higher education in our day-to-day lives. Join educator and activist Paul Susi in a discussion that will examine our assumptions and values around education and its impact on our lives.

Event | March 5, 2019

Conversation Project: Seeing the Forest and the Trees

We live in a state with abundant forests, and yet we don’t all see the same thing when we look into the woods. Oregon is known for both its timber industry and its deep environmental values. For many decades now management of our public forests has made headlines and driven apart neighbors. Facilitator Mariah Acton will lead this conversation to explore the values, identities, and beliefs we each have about our forests and what we, as a state, do to steward, manage, and protect this special resource.

Event | March 7, 2019

Returned

Caitlyn May covers the complicated story behind the closure of Douglas County's libraries and their difficult paths to reopening sustainably.

Beyond the Margins | January 31, 2019

Conversation Project: Seeing the Forest and the Trees

Stewarding Our Public Forests

Event | February 22, 2019

Conversation Project: Hunger in Our Communities

Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead participants in a conversation to explore the connections between the constructed story of hunger and the current and possible solutions to end hunger.

Event | February 26, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | May 18, 2019

Conversation Project: Fish Tales

Oregonians love the wild beauty of our 363 miles of coastline, but finding truly local seafood can be hard, even on the coast. The US imports approximately 90 percent of its seafood and ships out nearly as much to the global market. Why aren’t we eating more local seafood, now that preserving and distribution technologies are the most sophisticated they have ever been? Why do we consider seafood more a delicacy now than it has been in the past? In this conversation, food writer Jennifer Burns Bright helps participants explore our relationship with the products of the sea and cultural traditions involving fishing, eating seafood, and understanding the ocean’s bounty and challenges.

Event | June 4, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

Event | March 12, 2019

Conversation Project: Hunger in Our Communities

Hunger and its related problems are steadily increasing in the state of Oregon. At the same time, many Oregonians experience pride from living in an area with such abundant and sustainable food production. How can these truths about our state—both the hunger and the abundance—coexist? To understand the root causes of why hunger exists in our communities, we must also look at how we view hunger. Do we see hunger as an individual problem or a systemic one? How does hunger affect our individual identities as well as our sense of community? Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead participants in a conversation to explore the connections between the constructed story of hunger and the current and possible solutions to end hunger.

Event | April 6, 2019

Conversation Project: What We Owe

Debt has bound people together and driven them apart for millennia. Oppressive debt has played a role in major social revolutions that have resulted in the clearing of debt records, yet there are other debts, like the cost of being born, for which many could not imagine demanding repayment. In the past ten years, US national debt and personal debt have reached all-time highs—levels at which full repayment may seem implausible. But is repayment even necessary? Join educator April Slabosheski in a conversation that asks, What constitutes debt? How does debt shape the way we relate to one another? How do we decide which debts we will repay, and which we will not?

Event | April 11, 2019

POSTPONED: Conversation Project: Hunger in Our Communities

Hunger and its related problems are steadily increasing in the state of Oregon. At the same time, many Oregonians experience pride from living in an area with such abundant and sustainable food production. How can these truths about our state—both the hunger and the abundance—coexist? To understand the root causes of why hunger exists in our communities, we must also look at how we view hunger. Do we see hunger as an individual problem or a systemic one? How does hunger affect our individual identities as well as our sense of community? Facilitator Surabhi Mahajan will lead participants in a conversation to explore the connections between the constructed story of hunger and the current and possible solutions to end hunger.

Event | May 31, 2019

Conversation Project: Sharing Our Lives with Animals

Whether we find ourselves on farms or ranches, in cities, or in other places between, our lives are entangled with the lives of other species. Our experiences with domestic animals—in particular those considered pets or livestock—affect the ways we understand relationships with them, who we value and depend upon in wildly different ways. As scientific research and broader cultural shifts challenge common notions about the intelligence and emotional lives of other beings, we face complex quandaries of how to respectfully recognize and care for the needs of domestic companions. For this conversation, artist and educator Karin Bolender Hart invites us to share our own animal stories, consider how our personal experiences and beliefs about the lives of animals shape the stories we tell, and reflect on how these stories in turn affect our choices as caretakers, farmers, consumers, and companions. Admission Fee: $5

Event | May 29, 2019

Conversation Project: Fish Tales

Traditions and Challenges of Seafood in Oregon

Event | December 10, 2018

Conversation Project: Seeing the Forest for the Trees:

Stewarding Our Public Forests

Event | October 26, 2018

Conversation Project: Does Higher Education Matter?

Join educator and activist Paul Susi in a discussion that will examine our assumptions and values around education and its impact on our lives.​​​​​​​

Event | November 8, 2018

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces?

Event | October 20, 2018

Conversation Project: Fish Tales

Traditions and Challenges of Seafood in Oregon

Event | October 11, 2018

Conversation Project: How Do Our Values Influence Environmental Policy?

Given competing interests and visions of the public good, how do we protect our common resources such as land, water, and air? Join philosopher Monica Mueller to explore our environmental values and question how those values are reflected—or not reflected—in current local, national, and global environmental policies.

Event | October 16, 2018

Conversation Project: Who Are the Deserving Poor?

Join facilitator Erica Tucker for a conversation that explores our beliefs about poverty and asks us to consider our assumptions about who should—and shouldn’t—be eligible for support.

Event | October 18, 2018

Conversation Project: Sharing Our Lives with Animals

Artist and educator Karin Bolender Hart invites us to share our own animal stories, consider how our personal experiences and beliefs about the lives of animals shape the stories we tell, and reflect on how these stories in turn affect our choices as caretakers, farmers, consumers, and companions.

Event | September 27, 2018

How Do Our Values Influence Environmental Policy?

Given competing interests and visions of the public good, how do we protect our common resources such as land, water, and air? Join philosopher Monica Mueller to explore our environmental values and question how those values are reflected—or not reflected—in current local, national, and global environmental policies.

Event | September 20, 2018

What Makes a Good Tax?

The conversation, led by facilitator Mary Nolan, will explore the effects—both intended and unintended—of different types of taxes and invite participants to examine and understand their own ideas and their neighbors’ ideas about the best and worst characteristics of local, state, and federal taxes.

Event | September 6, 2018

Conversation Project: Fish Tales

Traditions and Challenges of Seafood in Oregon

Event | June 29, 2018

True Costs

Editor Kathleen Holt on the immeasurable obligations between parents and children

Magazine | April 27, 2018

Never Paid in Full

April Slabosheski on what Holocaust reparations can teach us about seemingly immeasurable debts

Magazine | April 27, 2018

Buying Time

Wendy N. Wagner on what we owe our children

Magazine | April 27, 2018

Conversation Project: What Makes a Job Good?

This conversation engages participants in exploring the quality and meanings of work in their own lives and in the lives of others.

Event | May 19, 2018

Conversation Project: What We Owe

Living With Debt

Event | March 11, 2018

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories about Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention?

Event | April 3, 2018

Think & Drink with Rinku Sen and Mary Li

The 2017–18 Think & Drink series on race, power, and justice concludes with a conversation with Rinku Sen. Sen is a senior strategist for Race Forward, a national organization that advances racial justice through research, media and practice, and a contributing writer for the organization’s daily news site, Colorlines.

Event | May 16, 2018

Conversation Project: What Makes a Job Good?

This conversation, led by historian Nikki Mandell, will engage participants in thinking about and discussing work more deeply. Participants will explore the quality and meanings of work in their own lives and those of people different from themselves and the connections between work as a personal endeavor and jobs as part of local and national economies.

Event | May 3, 2018

Protecting Inequality

Anoop Mirpuri on the economic causes of racist policing

Magazine | December 15, 2017

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories about Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention?

Event | June 14, 2018

On Bearing Bad News

Robert Leo Heilman writes about trying and failing to save library services in Douglas County.

Beyond the Margins | November 21, 2017

Conversation Project: What Makes a Job Good? *POSTPONED*

Most adults spend most of their waking hours working. Yet, we rarely have the time to consider why certain work brings us satisfaction and other work does not. This conversation, led by historian Nikki Mandell, will engage participants in thinking about and discussing work more deeply.

Event | February 28, 2018

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories about Wealth, Status, and Power

What exactly is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation.

Event | April 21, 2018

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories about Wealth, Status, and Power

What exactly is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation.

Event | January 20, 2018

My Brother's Keeper: "Waging a Living"

This fall, Four Rivers Cultural Center in Ontario will present My Brother's Keeper, a series of eight documentary film screenings exploring the lives of marginalized peoples and issues such as mental health, addiction, and mass incarceration. Each screening will be followed by a presentation and Q&A session by a local nonprofit or government agency.

Event | November 1, 2017

Think & Drink on Tourism in Tillamook County

Tillamook County Pioneer Museum and Oregon Humanities present a conversation on the challenges and benefits of tourism in Tillamook County.

Event | October 20, 2017

Conversation Project: Are International Trade Agreements Good for Oregon?

Oregonians have been active and vocal participants in global debates over trade since the creation of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). Lawyer and researcher Michael Fakhri will lead participants in a conversation about how we assess the value of international trade agreements.

Event | May 12, 2017

Think & Drink on Poverty, Displacement, and Inequality

A conversation with Portland leaders and activists working on creative ways to mitigate the effects of the city's housing shortage and build more stable, prosperous communities.

Event | May 17, 2017

Gaining Ground Film Screening and Discussion

This is an Oregon Humanities grant-funded event.

Event | March 21, 2017

Future: Portland 2

Grappling with values, change, and nostalgia has shaped—and continues to shape—the largest city in Oregon. A film by Ifanyi Bell

This Land | March 7, 2017

Sunday, Laundry Day

Every quarter counts in subsidized senior housing. An essay by Josephine Cooper

Magazine | August 11, 2016

Stolen Land and Borrowed Dollars

Creative resistance bloomed in the lead up to the Vancouver Olympics. An excerpt from Power Games: A Political History of the Olympics by Jules Boykoff

Magazine | April 11, 2016

The Problem with the Immigration Problem

Elliot Young writes about the origins of the belief that immigrants harm our society

Magazine | April 7, 2015

This Land Planned for You and Me

J. David Santen Jr. on what Oregon's communities look like forty years after the passage of Senate Bill 100

Magazine | December 5, 2013

New Again

Magazine | November 15, 2013

The State That Timber Built

Tara Rae Miner on what Oregon owes the struggling timber communities that helped shape the state'’s identity

Magazine | November 8, 2013

Who Cares About the Future of Music?

Opportunities and ethics in the age of Internet music streaming. An essay by Dave Allen

Magazine | November 8, 2013

Food Forward

Robert Paarlberg on the history of the Green Revolution and the future of global food production

Magazine | December 11, 2012

Clinging to the Dream

Why do Americans have such a hard time talking about class? An essay by Leigh van der Werff

Magazine | November 15, 2011

Immobile Dreams

How did the trailer come to be a symbol of failure? An essay by Rebecca Hartman

Magazine | November 15, 2011

Home Economics

Using the house to bridge the public/private divide.

Magazine | November 15, 2011

A Nation of Can-Do Optimists

A brief history of American cheerfulness by Ariel Gore

Magazine | December 5, 2010

Second Opinions

Camela Raymond asks economists, activists, public officials, and financiers for advice for Oregon's ailing economy.

Magazine | August 10, 2010

Blank Slate

In a single day, a forty-year-old man finds himself unmarried and unemployed. What to do next? An essay by Dave Weich

Magazine | August 10, 2010

Continual Watching

Historian Bob Bussel on Oregon'’s long history of protecting workers

Magazine | August 10, 2010

The Working Class

Bette Lynch Husted argues that hard times are good times to rethink our attitudes about the fungibility of workers.

Magazine | August 10, 2010

The Guilty Traveler

The complexities of being an American tourist in an inequitable world. An essay by Lucy Burningham

Magazine | November 23, 2009