Events & Opportunities

Photo of Conversation Project: Won't You Be My Neighbor?

May 14, 2019

Conversation Project: Won't You Be My Neighbor?

Studies show that neighbors interact much less than in previous decades. This has been theorized as a kind of side effect of modern life and the result of technology, limits on attention, and in some instances, differences in cultural concepts of what it means to be neighborly. Join facilitator Jen Mitas in this conversation that asks, How do you interact with your neighbors? How do you feel about those relationships? How might you improve or change these relationships in order to make a positive impact on the places you live? This conversation is a chance to reflect on one’s own role in the social networks that make up the places we live, and to complicate clichés about neighborliness that may be unconsciously rooted in the mid-twentieth century ideal of the American suburb. RSVP to this event here.

10:30 a.m., Portland State University, Portland

May 14, 2019

Conversation Project: It's a Free Country

Ever heard the expression "America: land of the brave and free" or "It's a free country! I can do what I want"? Maybe you think or say these things yourself. But what does it mean to "be free"? Join Ann Su for a conversation that explores the impact of culture on how we define, value, and experience freedom personally and in community. Participants will discuss different questions: Does everyone have access to freedom in the same way? What choices come with freedom and what are the responsibilities that accompany those choices? How does the concept of "freedom" play out in a diverse, democratic society?

2:00 p.m., Lane Community College Library, Eugene

May 15, 2019

Conversation Project: The Meaning of Climate Change

We live in a time of tremendous transformation as the reality of climate change and its effects on our communities become more apparent with every passing year. While there is still much that can and must be done to mitigate the range of impacts climate change might have, we are confronting the certainty of a crisis that will continue to unfold no matter what we do. What is the meaning of this extraordinary moment in human history? The meanings we construct about climate change affect how we think about it, our feelings about it and our willingness to take action. Portland State University instructor David Osborn leads a discussion exploring different meanings of climate change and how our understanding of meaning relates to action.

7:00 p.m., CoHo Ecovillage, Corvallis

May 15, 2019

Conversation Project: Everyone Can Be a Leader

Popular understandings of leadership tell us that leaders look a certain way: they are in charge. They possess outward strength. They are extroverted and act pragmatically rather than emotionally. Perhaps most important, leaders are people in positions of authority and power. Join facilitator Pepe Moscoso for a conversation that explores an alternative view of leadership and asks, When are we leaders in our communities? How can our unique senses of self contribute to our roles as leaders? What do we have to offer that is needed? Participants will have the chance to ask these questions of themselves and to explore with their friends and neighbors what makes a great leader in their communities.

7:00 p.m., Southeast Uplift Neighborhood Coalition, Portland

Photo of Conversation Project: Showing Up

May 16, 2019

Conversation Project: Showing Up

Being part of a community is an essential need for all of us. It is a place where we find others who share common ground, where our values and identities are reflected. Community is also a place where we are supported and thrive. Join facilitator Chi Mei Tam in this conversation to explore what it means to be part of a community. What does it looks like when community shows up for you and vice versa? How does it work? To what extent are shared values and identities in our community enough or not enough to help us thrive?

3:00 p.m., Clackamas Community College Harmony Community Campus, Milwaukie

Photo of Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

May 18, 2019

Conversation Project: The Middle Class and Other Stories About Wealth, Status, and Power

Join Oregon Humanities Executive Director Adam Davis for a conversation that explores what we think and how we talk about class in Oregon and the nation. What exactly, for example, is the middle class, who does it include and exclude, and why does it get so much attention? When does talking about class turn into class warfare, or pandering, or simple confusion? To what extent can we talk about class without talking about race, ethnicity, and cultural background? Class is clearly related to wealth and money, but it also involves much more than that, from education to dress to the shows we watch, the words we use, and the clothes we wear. What are the measures and markers that help us recognize class, and to what extent is class useful for seeing our state, our neighbors, and ourselves?

1:00 P.M., Tillamook County Pioneer Museum, Tillamook

May 20, 2019

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere? Where are we made to feel welcome? Where do we feel unwelcome and unsafe? How do race, language, gender identity, family structure, faith, where we work, and where we live shape how we are seen, welcomed, and accepted? Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us.

noon, Blue Mountain Community College - Hermiston Campus, Hermiston

May 20, 2019

Conversation Project: Is Technology Outpacing Our Humanity?

Technology is often considered a cure-all to our modern challenges. It is, undeniably, a powerful tool in addressing our greatest endeavors. Whether it be automation, the iPhone, or gene editing, some say our technical capacities have outstripped our moral knowledge. Others believe they have provided us immense creativity in dealing with our biggest ethical questions. Are these mutually exclusive? Facilitator Manuel Padilla will lead this conversation to explore how technology shapes our moral reasoning and our perceptions of, and relationships with, one another. This event will take place in the board room at Portland Public Schools' main office.

4:00 pm, Portland Public Schools Information Technology Department, Portland

May 21, 2019

Conversation Project: The Meaning of Climate Change

We live in a time of tremendous transformation as the reality of climate change and its effects on our communities become more apparent with every passing year. While there is still much that can and must be done to mitigate the range of impacts climate change might have, we are confronting the certainty of a crisis that will continue to unfold no matter what we do. What is the meaning of this extraordinary moment in human history? The meanings we construct about climate change affect how we think about it, our feelings about it and our willingness to take action. Portland State University instructor David Osborn leads a discussion exploring different meanings of climate change and how our understanding of meaning relates to action.

6:30 p.m., Beaverton City Library, Beaverton

Photo of Conversation Project: Recognizing the Diversity Among Us

May 21, 2019

Conversation Project: Recognizing the Diversity Among Us

Regardless of who we are or where we live, each of us lives among a diverse and vibrant collection of people and cultures. Reflecting on our differences can help us to see ourselves and “others” as part of our whole ecosystem. Awareness and appreciation of the ways that we are different from each other has all kinds of positive impact in our lives, creating in us a feeling of community and inspiring respect, empathy, and solidarity. Join facilitator Miguel Angel Herrada for a conversation that takes a new look at this idea and explores how a deep understanding of diversity can be an indispensable tool for making better choices about the world we share.

12:00 p.m., Oregon State Capitol, Salem