Events & Opportunities

October 23, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

What are the stories that shape how we think about growing old? How do we acknowledge the unique differences among aging individuals and separate the true stories from the myths? How do we accept the wisdom of our elders’ experiences while also recognizing new ideas about what it means to age in America? No matter our age, we all hear and tell stories about growing older that reflect our own ideals and fears—and the ideals and fears of our communities. Join facilitator Melissa Madenski as we look at the power of story in a conversation that will ask you to share your own experiences and ideas about aging and listen to the perspectives of others in your community.

10 a.m., Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, Lake Oswego

October 26, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation with Jennifer Burns Bright investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life. This event will take place in the Flora Room.

11 a.m., Estacada Public Library, Estacada

October 26, 2019

Conversation Project: Won't You Be My Neighbor?

Studies show that neighbors interact much less than in previous decades. This has been theorized as a kind of side effect of modern life and the result of technology, limits on attention, and in some instances, differences in cultural concepts of what it means to be neighborly. Join facilitator Jen Mitas in this conversation that asks, How do you interact with your neighbors? How do you feel about those relationships? How might you improve or change these relationships in order to make a positive impact on the places you live? This conversation is a chance to reflect on one’s own role in the social networks that make up the places we live, and to complicate clichés about neighborliness that may be unconsciously rooted in the mid-twentieth century ideal of the American suburb. This event will take place in the Community Room, on the main floor of the library.

1 p.m., Oregon City Public Library, Oregon City

November 6, 2019

Conversation Project: White Allyship in Close-knit Communities

What does it mean to be a white ally, especially in close-knit communities? And what does it mean to have the support of white allies? What is needed from white people in our communities to move the conversation about racism—both statewide and nationally—forward in a productive and respectful way? In this conversation led by facilitator Alexis James, participants will have the chance to explore their identities, learn how to acknowledge different lived experiences without alienating friends and neighbors, and move toward action in their own communities. This conversation will set the table for bringing discussions about racism, white culture, and identity to your dining room, living room, and backyard BBQs. This conversation is open to and welcomes people of all racial backgrounds and identities. This event will take place in the Lee Conference Room.

10 a.m., Clackamas County Youth Service Providers Network, Oregon City

December 4, 2019

Conversation Project: Sentenced for a Season, Punished for Life

Many of us have grown up being told—and believing—that after a person serves their sentence for a crime, their slate is wiped clean. Every possibility exists for them to find a decent job, a decent apartment, a decent car. From there, they can go on to build a decent life. But the truth does not often bear out this scenario. A felony conviction can restrict travel options, licensing options for employment, housing, and financial aid, just to name a few. What does it mean to our society that 8 percent of our overall US population—and 33 percent of African American men—who have felony convictions run into these barriers after they serve time in prison? Join facilitator Pamela Slaughter in a conversation about how this reality affects our communities and what alternatives might look like.

1 p.m., Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, Lake Oswego