Events & Opportunities

May 1, 2019

Conversation Project: Listening to Young People

What does it look like when adults really listen to young people? Cultural beliefs about young people perpetuate myths that cause harm, especially when combined with laws that control their physical and emotional autonomy and limit their ability to participate in public life. Young people experiencing marginalization for any reason—race, gender, sexuality, ability—also have the added layer of not being taken seriously because of their age. And yet the history of social justice movements in the United States is deeply connected to young people’s agency, autonomy, and power. Join facilitator Emily Squires for a conversation that asks folks to explore their own beliefs about what it means to be young and to reflect on their individual relationship to power as it relates to age.

6:00 p.m., River Grove Elementary School, Lake Oswego

Photo of Conversation Project: Talking About Dying

May 2, 2019

Conversation Project: Talking About Dying

Death is a universal event that transcends many of the differences between us, but it's not something that we have regular opportunities to think and talk about. Oregon Humanities developed the Talking about Dying program to create more public opportunities to reflect on the stories and influences that shape our thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members. Talking about Dying community conversations are free, ninety-minute facilitated discussions geared toward public audiences (ages 15+). During the program, participants talk together about questions such as, What do we want—and not want—at the end of our life? How might our family, culture, religion, and beliefs shape how we think about death? How do access to care, geography, and desires to be remembered affect our decisions about the end of our life? Facilitated by Andrea Cano.

4:00 p.m., Oregon City Public Library, Oregon City

May 11, 2019

Conversation Project: Race and Adoption

The decision to adopt across racial or cultural lines is a lifelong commitment to exploring matters of race and identity, confronting racism in all its forms, and developing new skills and perspectives. In this conversation, facilitator Astrid Castro will ask participants to explore questions such as, What role do race and racism play in your family? What are the personal experiences that inform how you talk to adopted children in your life about where they are from? Where do you need to grow to be the best resource you can be for children who are adopted? While particularly of relevance to families directly in transracial adoptive families, this conversation will also raise questions of how we talk to children about important issues like race and identity, adoption, and cultural appropriation. This event will take place in the Community Room.

2:00 p.m., West Linn Public Library, West Linn

Photo of Conversation Project: Showing Up

May 16, 2019

Conversation Project: Showing Up

Being part of a community is an essential need for all of us. It is a place where we find others who share common ground, where our values and identities are reflected. Community is also a place where we are supported and thrive. Join facilitator Chi Mei Tam in this conversation to explore what it means to be part of a community. What does it looks like when community shows up for you and vice versa? How does it work? To what extent are shared values and identities in our community enough or not enough to help us thrive?

3:00 p.m., Clackamas Community College Harmony Community Campus, Milwaukie