Events & Opportunities

Photo of Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

March 25, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life.

6 p.m., Independent Publishing Resource Center, Portland

March 25, 2019

Conversation Project: Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives.

6:00 p.m., Portland Metro Arts Center, Portland

March 26, 2019

Conversation Project: Why DIY? Self-sufficiency and American Life

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life.

6:30 p.m., Fern Ridge Public Library, Veneta

Photo of Conversation Project: White Allyship in Close-knit Communities

March 28, 2019

Conversation Project: White Allyship in Close-knit Communities

What does it mean to be a white ally, especially in close-knit, rural communities? And what does it mean to have the support of white allies? What is needed from white people in our communities to move the conversation about racism—both statewide and nationally—forward in a productive and respectful way? In this conversation led by facilitator Alexis James, participants will have the chance to explore their identities, learn how to acknowledge different lived experiences without alienating friends and neighbors, and move toward action in their own communities. This conversation will set the table for bringing discussions about racism, white culture, and identity to your dining room, living room, and backyard BBQs.

4:00 p.m., Oregon City Public Library, Oregon City

March 29, 2019

Conversation Project: Recognizing the Diversity Among Us

Join facilitator Miguel Angel Herrada for a conversation that takes a new look at this idea and explores how a deep understanding of diversity can be an indispensable tool for making better choices about the world we share.

7:00 p.m., Woodburn Chemeketa, Woodburn

March 29, 2019

Airlie Poetry Night

Airlie Press, a nonprofit publisher, is hosting a free, public, open poetry event at Devil's Den Wine Bar in the Alberta Arts District as part of the Association of Writers and Publishers (AWP) conference. This event is family-friendly, all-ages, and open to anyone interested in reading their work. The event will also featured notable local writers.

7:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.,

Photo of Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

April 2, 2019

Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

In 2015, Oregon’s population exceeded 4 million people. Not only are we growing in number, we’re also changing demographically. Considering that Oregon has a history of racial exclusion, these changes prompt questions about Oregonian identity and values. How do we build communities that welcome people of all backgrounds? How are minority and under-represented populations included and treated today? Drawing on the diverse histories and backgrounds of attendees, Kerani Mitchell leads a conversation that asks what makes us Oregonian and how can we create inclusive communities.

6:00 p.m., Arts Council of Lake Oswego, Lake Oswego

April 3, 2019

Conversation Project: Power, Privilege, and Racial Diversity in Oregon

Although Census data show Oregon’s population becoming more racially diverse, the state remains one of the whitest in the nation. Many Oregonians value racial diversity and the dimension and depth it adds to our lives, yet we remain largely isolated from one another and have yet to fulfill the vision of a racially integrated society. Willamette University professor Emily Drew will lead participants in a conversation about the challenges to creating racially diverse, inclusive communities despite the accomplishments since the civil rights era. What does the racial integration of place require of us, and how might we prepare to create and embrace this opportunity?

6:00 p.m., Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, Corvallis

April 4, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Fake News

On both national and local levels, Oregonians have seen how the news can both represent and misrepresent the facts at hand. From debate over local opinions on the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge to the discourse around “alternative facts,” it can seem difficult to find current and accurate information to use as we make decisions in our communities. This conversation, led by librarian Kelly McElroy, gives Oregonians a chance to consider their own practices and values around news consumption and find new ways to get the information they need.

6:00 p.m., Crook County Library, Prineville

April 4, 2019

Conversation Project: Bias and Kids

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

4:00 p.m., Oregon City Public Library, Oregon City