Events & Opportunities

March 7, 2020

It's a Free Country: Exploring the Limitations and Responsibilities of Freedom

Ever heard the expression "America: land of the brave and free" or "It's a free country! I can do what I want"? Maybe you think or say these things yourself. But what does it mean to "be free"? Join Ann Su for a conversation that explores the impact of culture on how we define, value, and experience freedom personally and in community. Participants will discuss different questions: Does everyone have access to freedom in the same way? What choices come with freedom and what are the responsibilities that accompany those choices? How does the concept of "freedom" play out in a diverse, democratic society?

3:00 p.m., Downtown Bend Library, Bend

March 7, 2020

Conversation Project: Why DIY?

Are we as self-sufficient as we can be? As we should be? What are the pleasures and pitfalls of doing it yourself? This conversation with Jennifer Burns Bright investigates why we strive to be makers and doers in a world that provides more conveniences than ever before. How might the “new industrial revolution” of tinkerers and crafters affect American schools and workplaces? How do maker spaces or skills courses foster greater engagement and involvement? What could be left behind when we increase self-sufficiency in a community? All kinds of DIY interests are welcome: we can focus on foraging, permaculture, prepping, woodworking, or hovercraft making—or perhaps all of these at once! Through our shared stories, we will seek to understand more deeply how DIY functions in American life. This event will take place in Meeting Room A.

3:00 p.m., Beaverton City Library, Beaverton

March 9, 2020

Can We Get Along? Examining Our Personal Experiences of Connection and Community

In 1992, in the midst of riots sparked by the acquittal of police officers who brutally beat him, Rodney King asked, “Can we get along?” This iconic American question still resonates today. What is it that drives this question, and why can it be so difficult to answer? What holds us back from connecting with each other? How do our personal experiences contribute to—and have the potential to break down—these barriers? Join facilitator Chisao Hata as she holds space to examine our individual and collective questions on race, perspectives, and cultural values around what brings us together and what separates us. This conversation may include some hands-on activities.

6:00 p.m., Central Oregon Community College -- Redmond Campus, Redmond

March 10, 2020

Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

As individuals and groups, we experience different levels of privilege and power. Recognizing our relationship to oppression can bring feelings of guilt, shame, and grief. How can we hold space for these feelings while also creating conditions for new insights to emerge to deepen our understanding of each other and ourselves? Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives. This conversation will include some hands-on activities.

11:30 a.m., Pacific University McCall Center for Civic Engagement, Forest Grove

March 10, 2020

Can We Get Along? Examining Our Personal Experiences of Connection and Community

In 1992, in the midst of riots sparked by the acquittal of police officers who brutally beat him, Rodney King asked, “Can we get along?” This iconic American question still resonates today. What is it that drives this question, and why can it be so difficult to answer? What holds us back from connecting with each other? How do our personal experiences contribute to—and have the potential to break down—these barriers? Join facilitator Chisao Hata as she holds space to examine our individual and collective questions on race, perspectives, and cultural values around what brings us together and what separates us. This conversation may include some hands-on activities.

5:30 p.m., Central Oregon Community College - Prineville, Prineville

March 11, 2020

Is Technology Outpacing Our Humanity?

Technology is often considered a cure-all to our modern challenges. It is, undeniably, a powerful tool in addressing our greatest endeavors. Whether it be automation, the iPhone, or gene editing, some say our technical capacities have outstripped our moral knowledge. Others believe they have provided us immense creativity in dealing with our biggest ethical questions. Are these mutually exclusive? Facilitator Manuel Padilla will lead this conversation to explore how technology shapes our moral reasoning and our perceptions of, and relationships with, one another.

6:00 p.m., Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, Lake Oswego

March 11, 2020

Think & Drink on Running for and Holding Public Office

This Think & Drink conversation will explore experiences of running for and holding public office. What determines who runs for public office in Oregon? What does it mean to represent a diverse community? Who runs and why, and to whom are they most accountable? Join us for a conversation on representation, democracy, and elections with Gresham City Councilor Eddy Morales, Ana del Rocío, executive director of Oregon Futures Lab, and other guests.

7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Alberta Rose Theatre, Portland

March 12, 2020

Seeing the Forest and the Trees: Stewarding Our Public Forests

We live in a state with abundant forests, and yet we don’t all see the same thing when we look into the woods. Oregon is known for both its timber industry and its deep environmental values. For many decades now management of our public forests has made headlines and driven apart neighbors. Facilitator Mariah Acton will lead this conversation to explore the values, identities, and beliefs we each have about our forests and what we, as a state, do to steward, manage, and protect this special resource.

6:00 p.m., Marys River Grange #685, Philomath

March 14, 2020

Bias and Kids: How Do Our Prejudices Affect Our Children? - English

Most people agree that children need healthy, loving, supportive environments to thrive. But, as parents, family members, teachers, neighbors, and voters—how do our biases influence how we interact with the children in our lives and communities? And, how do those biases influence how children perceive themselves and what they will become? During our conversation led by Verónika Nuñez and Kyrié Kellett, we will reflect on how our biases—conscious and unconscious—related to gender, race, class, culture, and other traits, shape everything from our subtle interactions with the kids we care for to the way we make political decisions that influence children in our society.

9:30 a.m., Sherwood Public Library, Sherwood

March 18, 2020

The Space Between Us: Immigrants, Refugees, and Oregon

Global displacement is on the rise, thanks to intractable conflicts, economics, and climate change. Oregonians have and will continue to see the results of international migration in our neighborhoods. In this conversation, Manuel Padilla, who has worked with refugees in Haiti, Chad, and Washington, DC, asks participants to consider questions of uprootedness, hospitality, identity, perception, and integration and how we might build more informed, responsive, resilient, and vibrant communities.

6:00 p.m., Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon, Eugene