Events & Opportunities

February 26, 2020

Conversation Project: Sentenced for a Season, Punished for Life

Many of us have grown up being told—and believing—that after a person serves their sentence for a crime, their slate is wiped clean. Every possibility exists for them to find a decent job, a decent apartment, a decent car. From there, they can go on to build a decent life. But the truth does not often bear out this scenario. A felony conviction can restrict travel options, licensing options for employment, housing, and financial aid, just to name a few. What does it mean to our society that 8 percent of our overall US population—and 33 percent of African American men—who have felony convictions run into these barriers after they serve time in prison? Join facilitator Pamela Slaughter in a conversation about how this reality affects our communities and what alternatives might look like.

6:00 p.m., Lewis & Clark College, Portland

March 4, 2020

Conversation Project: What Is Cultural Appropriation?

Issues of cultural appropriation and identity are complicated. Power dynamics influence who benefits from certain cultural experience, and—given the global nature of our world—parts of our individual and cultural identities are shaped by cultures other than our own. How do we make sense of this and what effect does it have on us as individuals and as Oregonians? Facilitator Surabhi Majahan will lead us in a conversation to explore cultural appropriation beyond who’s “allowed” to wear certain clothing or cook particular foods.

6:00 p.m., ThinkShout, Portland

March 4, 2020

Conversation Project: White Allyship in Close-knit Communities

What does it mean to be a white ally, especially in close-knit communities? And what does it mean to have the support of white allies? What is needed from white people in our communities to move the conversation about racism—both statewide and nationally—forward in a productive and respectful way? In this conversation led by facilitator Alexis James, participants will have the chance to explore their identities, learn how to acknowledge different lived experiences without alienating friends and neighbors, and move toward action in their own communities. This conversation will set the table for bringing discussions about racism, white culture, and identity to your dining room, living room, and backyard BBQs. This conversation is open to and welcomes people of all racial backgrounds and identities. This event will take place in the auditorium.

6:30 p.m., Abernethy Conversations About Race, Portland

March 11, 2020

Think & Drink on Running for and Holding Public Office

This Think & Drink conversation will explore experiences of running for and holding public office. What determines who runs for public office in Oregon? What does it mean to represent a diverse community? Who runs and why, and to whom are they most accountable? Join us for a conversation on representation, democracy, and elections with Gresham City Councilor Eddy Morales, Ana del Rocío, executive director of Oregon Futures Lab, and other guests.

7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Alberta Rose Theatre, Portland

March 19, 2020

Conversation Project: Fair Share

People and businesses expect certain public services—education, transportation, protection, to name a few—and “tax” is the word we use to indicate how we pay for these services. But among taxpayers, areas of frequent and vehement disagreement are what constitutes a needed public service, how much we should pay for those services, and who will be taxed (and how) for them. The conversation, led by facilitator Mary Nolan, will explore the effects—both intended and unintended—of different types of taxes and invite participants to examine and understand their own ideas and their neighbors’ ideas about the best and worst characteristics of local, state, and federal taxes. The admission fee for this conversation is $5. This event will take place in the grange hall.

6:30 p.m., Columbia Grange 267, Corbett

April 7, 2020

Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

As individuals and groups, we experience different levels of privilege and power. Recognizing our relationship to oppression can bring feelings of guilt, shame, and grief. How can we hold space for these feelings while also creating conditions for new insights to emerge to deepen our understanding of each other and ourselves? Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives. This conversation will include some hands-on activities. Please RSVP here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/exploring-power-privilege-with-courage-creativity-and-compassion-registration-92806255007

10:00 a.m., Portland State University, Portland

April 14, 2020

Exploring Power and Privilege with Courage, Creativity, and Compassion

As individuals and groups, we experience different levels of privilege and power. Recognizing our relationship to oppression can bring feelings of guilt, shame, and grief. How can we hold space for these feelings while also creating conditions for new insights to emerge to deepen our understanding of each other and ourselves? Join facilitator Ridhi D’Cruz for a conversation that explores how we face and transform oppression in our everyday lives. This conversation will include some hands-on activities.

6:00 p.m., Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods, Portland

April 30, 2020

Facilitation Training

This two-day training will help you strengthen your skills in planning and facilitating conversations on issues you care about within your organization or in the broader community.

8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Oregon Humanities, Portland

May 4, 2020

Conversation Project: Where Are You From?

This conversation aims to bring people together to discuss the diverse experiences of belonging in Oregon. Challenging stereotypical visions of what it means to be an “Oregonian,” participants are asked to consider how being an Oregonian or part of the community looks different for all of us. Centered around participant’s unique identities, we will look inward and share how our race, gender and other identity markers shape our relationships to our community and the world around us. We will touch on Oregon’s founding racial exclusion laws, immigration trends and share how we can foster inclusion in our own lives. This event will take place at the Multnomah Arts Center in room 30.

7:00 p.m., Southwest Neighborhoods Inc, Portland

May 13, 2020

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

What are the stories that shape how we think about growing old? How do we acknowledge the unique differences among aging individuals and separate the true stories from the myths? How do we accept the wisdom of our elders’ experiences while also recognizing new ideas about what it means to age in America? No matter our age, we all hear and tell stories about growing older that reflect our own ideals and fears—and the ideals and fears of our communities. Join facilitator Melissa Madenski as we look at the power of story in a conversation that will ask you to share your own experiences and ideas about aging and listen to the perspectives of others in your community. The admission fee for this event is $5, but no one will be turned away for lack of funds. This event will take place in the grange hall.

6:30 p.m., Columbia Grange 267, Corbett