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Programs

Think & Drink 2016

A special series featuring Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists in Portland, Bend, Eugene, Astoria, and Ashland

Oregon Humanities’ Think & Drink series has been sparking provocative conversations about big ideas since 2009. In 2016 we’re expanding beyond Portland, presenting conversations with Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists in Portland, Bend, Eugene, Astoria, and Ashland.

The 2016 Think & Drink series dates are as follows:

  • February 16 in Portland and February 17 in Bend: Novelist and essayist Laila Lalami, author of The Moor’s Account
  • April 19 in Portland and April 20 in Eugene: Journalist and novelist Héctor Tobar, author of Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine and the Miracle That Set Them Free
  • July 20 in Portland and July 21 in Astoria: Journalist and historian Isabel Wilkerson, author of The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration
  • October 19 in Portland: Investigative journalist Katherine Boo, author of Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity

2016 Think & Drink events in Portland will take place from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. at the Alberta Rose Theatre at 3000 NE Alberta St. Doors open at 6:00 p.m., and minors are welcome when accompanied by a parent or guardian.

Series tickets for all four events are $50 for general admission or $100 for preferred seating and are available online now at albertarosetheatre.com. Single tickets, $15 for general admission or $25 for preferred seating, will be available in January.

Our Feburary 17 event with Laila Lalami in Bend will take place at the Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 SW Century Drive. The all-ages event begins at 7:00 p.m.; doors will open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $8 in advance at bendticket.com or $10 at the door.

Venues and locations for other events outside of Portland will be announced soon.

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WeLead

Youth-powered conversations for change

WeLead is a collaboration between Oregon Humanities and Catlin Gabel’s PLACE program that trains high school students to lead community conversations about challenging issues. Ten to fifteen students from Portland-area high schools will participate in five biweekly, two-hour trainings in which they will learn to plan and facilitate public discussions. The trainings will be held at the PLACE Center in North Portland on Tuesday afternoons (April 5 and 19, May 3, 17, and 31). The program will culminate in a public event created by program participants on June 1, 2016. The program will repeat with a second cohort of students in fall 2016.

WeLead is open to students from all Portland-area high schools in their sophomore through senior years. Students will be compensated for time spent in the WeLead program with a $200 honorarium. Applications for the spring 2016 session are due by February 20, 2016.

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Think & Drink with Laila Lalami

February 16 in Portland and February 17 in Bend

Laila LalamiWriter Laila Lalami kicks off Oregon Humanities’ 2016 Think & Drink series with conversations about race, displacement, and religious and national identity in Portland February 16 and Bend February 17.

Lalami, who was born and raised in Morocco, is the author of three novels and numerous essays. Her most recent novel, The Moor’s Account, is an imagined memoir of a Moroccan slave, called Estebanico by his Spanish captors, who was the first native African explorer of the Americas. The novel won the American Book Award, the Arab American Book Award, the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, was on the Man Booker Prize longlist, and was a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for fiction.

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War Stories Reading, Writing, and Discussion Group in Portland

Free, begins December 1

America has been at war for more than a decade. Those who serve, their families, and civilians at home all experience wartime differently, and the gaps in understanding each other’s perspectives can be huge. Beginning this December, Portland-area veterans, family members of veterans, and civilians are invited to join a small group (twenty-five people or fewer) for a free, six-month reading, writing, and discussion group. War Stories will be an opportunity to come together to explore the experience of military service, wartime, and the challenges and opportunities of transitioning from active duty to civilian life through talking and reflection.

Participants will read selections of poems, essays, and memoir from veterans and writers from the Civil War through the most recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan that cover themes such as patriotism, loyalty, ethics, homecoming, and family. There will also be prompts for participants to write about and reflect on their own experiences and impressions of war.

The program will take place the first Tuesday of each month, December 1, 2015, through May 3, 2016, at American Legion Post 134, 2104 NE Alberta St., Portland, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

War Stories is presented in partnership with American Legion Post 134 and will be moderated by a facilitator, Sean Davis, who is a veteran and published author. Materials and a meal will be provided at each session.

To learn more about the program and register, contact Sean Davis at (503) 679-3885 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

This program has received major support from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Standing Together initiative, created to promote understanding of the military experience and to support returning veterans.

2015–16 Author! Author! Series by Deschutes Public Library Foundation

Elizabeth Gilbert

Oregon Humanities is a cosponsor of Deschutes Public Library Foundation’s fourth annual Author! Author! literary series from October 2015 to May 2016. The series features writers Timothy Egan, Elizabeth Gilbert, Lisa See, and Alice Hoffman, who will discuss their work, literature, and the writing process.

General admission tickets are $25 each. Those tickets, as well as preferred seating tickets that include access to a private author reception, are available for purchase online. Series tickets for all four presentations are available for $80. Revenue from ticket sales will support the library’s services and programs. For more information about the events listed below visit the Deschutes Public Library Foundation website or call (541) 312-1027.

November 8, 2015—Special Event
James McBride, National Book Award–winning author of The Good Lord Bird, Miracle at St. Anna, and The Color of Water, will present a special musical performance with the Good Lord Bird Band at the Bend High School auditorium, 230 Northeast 6th St., Bend, 4:00 p.m. (This event is not included in series tickets.)

November 13, 2015
Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love, The Signature of All Things, Committed, The Last American Man, and Big Magic, at the Bend High School auditorium, 230 Northeast 6th St., Bend, 7:00 p.m.

February 25, 2016
Lisa See, author of the New York Times bestseller Snow Flower and the Secret Fan and eight other books, including Shanghai Girls and On Gold Mountain: The One-Hundred-Year Odyssey of My Chinese-American Family, at the Bend High School auditorium, 230 Northeast 6th St., Bend, 7:00 p.m.

May 26, 2016
Alice Hoffman, New York Times bestselling author of The Dovekeepers, The Museum of Extraordinary Things, The Marriage of Opposites, The Probable Future, and many other titles, at the Bend High School auditorium, 230 Northeast 6th St., Bend, 7:00 p.m.

Past events
October 1, 2015
Timothy Egan, Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter and Nation Book Award–winning author of seven books, including
The Worst Hard Time, at the Bend High School Auditorium, 230 Northeast 6th St., Bend, 7:00 p.m.

Growing the Latino Voice

According to the 2010 census, more than one in ten Oregonians identify as Latino, but the number of Latino political representatives is disproportionately low. Beginning in October, the Latino Partnership Program of the Oregon Community Foundation will present Growing the Latino Voice, a series of conversations and workshops in the Willamette Valley and Southern Oregon designed to improve political participation and representation among young Latino Oregonians. The discussion portion of these programs will be facilitated by Oregon Humanities.

Growing the Latino Voice begins October 31 in Salem and November 14 in Medford. Latino men and women aged 22 to 40 are invited to participate. To sign up for either date, contact Rocio Perez at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Stream Think & Drink with Genevieve Bell

Genevieve BellCultural anthropologist and Intel vice president joined Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, at the Alberta Rose Theatre on September 23 for a Think & Drink conversation about how cultural biases shape our development and use of technologies, and how new technologies affect our relationships to time, space, and one another. Audio and video from the event is available below.

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Future: Portland Screening and Discussion

still from On Monday, October 19, Oregon Humanities and Multnomah County Library will present a screening of the OH-produced short film Future: Portland and a panel discussion at North Portland Library. The panel will feature filmmakers Ifanyi Bell and Margaret Jacobsen and Rukaiyah Adams, chief investment officer for Meyer Memorial Trust, who appears in the film.

Following the panel, Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, will lead a community conversation on displacement, community, and other topics raised by the film.

The event takes place from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. at North Portland Library, 512 N. Killingsworth St. Seating is first-come, first-served.

Stream Our Think & Drink with Eula Biss

Essayist Eula Biss, author of On Immunity: An Inoculation, joined Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, for a conversation about vaccination, immunity, and what we owe one another as citizens at the Alberta Rose Theatre in Portland on July 30, 2015. Audio and video from the event are below.

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Think & Drink with Genevieve Bell

Intel’s cultural anthropologist talks about how technologies affect our relationships with time, space, and each other September 23.

Genevieve BellOregon Humanities’ 2015 Think & Drink series concludes on September 23 with a conversation with cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell at the Alberta Rose Theatre.

Bell has spent her career studying what she calls “the intersection of cultural practice and technology adoption.” She has worked at Intel since 1998 and holds several patents for consumer electronics innovations. As vice president of Intel’s corporate strategy office, she leads a team of social scientists and designers who travel the world to learn how people relate to electronics and use their findings to shape technologies of the future.

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Think & Drink with Eula Biss

Author of "On Immunity: An Inoculation" in Portland July 30

Eula BissOregon Humanities’ 2015 Think & Drink series continues July 30 with a conversation with writer Eula Biss at the Alberta Rose Theatre.

Biss is the author of On Immunity: An Inoculation, an investigation of fears and anxieties surrounding vaccination. The book, which Biss says was inspired by conversations with other mothers while pregnant with her first child, was named one of the ten best books of 2014 by the New York Times Book Review. An excerpt from the book is available online here. The Chicago writer’s other works include Notes from No Man’s Land, a collection of essays on race and identity in America, and The Balloonists, a collection of narrative prose poems.

Think & Drink sparks provocative conversations about big ideas. At this event, Biss will discuss vaccination and immunity, science and fear, and choosing between personal belief and public benefit with Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities.

The event will take place July 30, 2015, at the Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta St., Portland, from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. Doors open at 6:00 p.m., and minors are welcome when accompanied by a parent or guardian. General admission tickets are $10 each ($25 for preferred seating) and may be purchased at albertarosetheatre.com, by phone at (503) 764-4131, or in person at the Alberta Rose box office.

The 2015 Think & Drink series is supported by our media sponsor, Willamette Week, and funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust. Thanks also to our communications partners for this event: City Club of Portland and Literary Arts.

Can’t make it to Think & Drink? You can stream our conversation live right here starting at 7:00 p.m.

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Brave New World: Achieving Gender Equity in the Performing Arts

Oregon Humanities and Profile Theatre present a conversation moderated by Oregon Humanities board member Kimberly Howard about issues of gender equity across performing arts disciplines. The event takes place Wednesday, June 17 at 7:30 p.m. at Artists Repertory Theatre’s Morrison Stage, 1515 SW Morrison St., Portland. Panelists include Adriana Baer, artistic director of Profile Theatre; Pat Zagelow, executive director of Friends of Chamber Music; and Jane Vogel, founder of Age & Gender Equity in the Arts. The discussion is free, and tickets may be reserved online.

Stream Our Think & Drink with Walidah Imarisha

Walidah Imarisha - photo by Kim NguyenEducator, writer, organizer, and spoken word artist Walidah Imarisha joined Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, at the Alberta Rose on May 21, 2015, for a conversation about connections between science fiction and social change, and continuity and resistance in the history of Oregon’s black communities.

Imarisha is the author of Scars/Stars, a collection of poetry, and editor of Octavia’s Brood, an anthology of social justice-driven science fiction—a genre she terms “visionary fiction.” She directed the documentary film Finding Common Ground in New Orleans, performs as part of the spoken word duo Good Sista Bad Sista, and since 2009 has led one of Oregon Humanities’ most popular Conversation Project discussions, “Why Aren’t There More Black People in Oregon? A Hidden History.”

Here are audio and video from the event. For more information about our 2015 Think & Drink series, visit the Think & Drink page.

 

Think & Drink with Walidah Imarisha

Oregon Humanities’ 2015 Think & Drink series continues Thursday, May 21 with educator, writer, organizer, and spoken word artist Walidah Imarisha from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. (Please note: this is a change from the earlier publicized times) at the Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta St., Portland. Click here to purchase tickets. If you have problems with the Alberta Rose ticketing site, call (503) 764-4131 for assistance.

Walidah Imarisha’s resume is too broad to sum up in a sentence. She is the author of Angels with Dirty Faces, a nonfiction work on prison abolition, and Scars/Stars, a collection of poetry, and editor of Octavia’s Brood, an anthology of social justice-driven science fiction. She is an educator who has taught at Oregon colleges and universities. She directed the documentary film Finding Common Ground in New Orleans. She has performed as part of the spoken word duo Good Sista Bad Sista. And since 2009 she has led one of Oregon Humanities’ most popular Conversation Project discussions, “Why Aren’t There More Black People in Oregon? A Hidden History.”

At Think & Drink, Imarisha will talk about continuity and resistance in the history of Oregon’s black communities, alternatives to incarceration, and science fiction and social change with Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities.

General admission tickets are $10 each or $25 for preferred seating, and are available online at albertarosetheatre.com. Tickets to all events in the 2015 Think & Drink series are also available. Read more about the 2015 series here.

Doors open at 6:00 p.m., and minors are welcome when accompanied by a parent or guardian. Audio from the event will be streamed live on this page.

Think & Drink is a series that sparks provocative conversations about big ideas. The 2015 Think & Drink series is supported by our media sponsor, Willamette Week, and funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Thanks to our communications partners for this event with Walidah Imarisha: City Club of Portland, Bitch Media, Oregon Historical Society, and Portland State University Black Studies department.

Announcing 2015 Public Program Grant Awards

Oregon Humanities grants fund community events across the state.

Photo of 2014 grantee Fishtrap Summer Gathering by Leon WerdingerIn February, the Oregon Humanities board of directors awarded $59,900 in grants to thirteen nonprofit organizations from around the state. These grants support public programs that will spark meaningful conversations around compelling subjects that affect Oregonians.

This year’s grants will fund programs on subjects such as criminalization, cognitive differences, the history of Union County, and the 1948 Vanport Flood. Read more about our 2015 public program grant recipients.

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Watch Think & Drink with Barry Lopez

Oregon Humanities’ 2015 Think & Drink series kicked off February 5 with renowned essayist and fiction writer Barry Lopez in conversation with Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities. Catch audio and video from the sold-out event below.

 

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Think & Drink with Barry Lopez

Barry Lopez

Oregon Humanities’ 2015 Think & Drink series will kick off Thursday, February 5 with renowned essayist and fiction writer Barry Lopez from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. at the Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta St., Portland. Click here to purchase tickets. If you have problems with the Alberta Rose ticketing site, call (503) 764-4131 for assistance.

Although Lopez is best known for nature and travel writing, he has also written widely on issues of racial and social justice. At Think & Drink, Lopez will discuss reconciliation, resistance, justice, and place with Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities.

“If I were asked what I want to accomplish as a writer, I would say it’s to contribute to a literature of hope,” Lopez wrote in the introduction to his essay collection About This Life.

Lopez is the author of Arctic Dreams, for which he received the National Book Award; Of Wolves and Men, a National Book Award finalist; and eight works of fiction, including Light Action in the Caribbean, Field Notes, and Resistance. His most recent books are Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape, a reader’s dictionary of regional landscape terms, which he edited with Debra Gwartney, and Outside, a collection of six stories with engravings by Barry Moser.

General admission tickets are $10 each or $25 for preferred seating, and are available online at albertarosetheatre.com. Tickets to all events in the 2015 Think & Drink series, featuring Walidah Imarisha and Eula Biss, are also available. Read more about the 2015 series here.

Doors open at 6:00 p.m., and minors are welcome when accompanied by a parent or guardian. Audio and video from the event will be streamed live on this page.

Think & Drink is a happy-hour series that sparks provocative conversations about big ideas. The 2015 Think & Drink series is supported by our media sponsor, Willamette Week, and funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust. Our community partners for this event are the City Club of Portland, Oregon Historical Society, Literary Arts and the Coalition of Oregon Land Trusts.

Photo of Barry Lopez by David Liitschwager

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2015 Think & Drink Series

Tickets for all four Portland events available now.

Tickets are now available for Oregon Humanities’ 2015 Think & Drink series at Portland’s Alberta Rose Theatre. This year’s guests include Barry Lopez, Walidah Imarisha, and Eula Biss. General admission tickets are $10 each or $25 for the remaining three events in the series, and are available online at albertarosetheatre.com. Preferred seating tickets, which include guaranteed seats in the first five rows and admission to pre-show receptions, are also available, for $25 per event or $75 for all three.

Think & Drink is a happy-hour series that sparks provocative conversations about big ideas. Think & Drink events take place from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. at the Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta St. in Portland. Doors open at 6:00 p.m., and minors are welcome when accompanied by a parent or guardian. The 2015 Think & Drink series will feature the following guests:

  • February 5: Barry Lopez, author, essayist and fiction-writer. Lopez is the author of Arctic Dreams, for which he received the National Book Award, Of Wolves and Men, a National Book Award finalist, and eight works of fiction, including Light Action in the Caribbean, Field Notes, and Resistance. His most recent books are Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape, a reader’s dictionary of regional landscape terms, which he edited with Debra Gwartney, and Outside, a collection of six stories with engravings by Barry Moser. He lives on the McKenzie River near Finn Rock, Oregon. Our community partners for this event are the City Club of Portland, Oregon Historical Society, Literary Arts and the Coalition of Oregon Land Trusts.

  • May 21: Walidah Imarisha, educator, writer, organizer, and spoken word artist. For the past five years, Imarisha has led Oregon Humanities Conversation Project programs on Oregon black history, alternatives to incarceration, and the history of hip hop. She has taught in Portland State University’s black studies department, Oregon State University’s women’s studies department, and Southern New Hampshire University’s English department, and is the author of the poetry collection Scars/Stars and the forthcoming book Angels with Dirty Faces, which focuses on criminal justice. She is also coeditor with adrienne maree brown of the forthcoming Octavia’s Brood, an anthology of radical science & speculative fiction written by organizers & activists. She lives in Portland.

  • July 30: Eula Biss, author of On Immunity: An Inoculation, a book that explores cultural myths about immunity, vaccination, filth, and purity. Her other books are Notes from No Man’s Land: American Essays and The Balloonists, a collection of poems. Her essays have recently appeared in The Best American Nonrequired Reading and the Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Nonfiction as well as in The Believer, Gulf Coast, Denver Quarterly, Third Coast, and Harper’s. She lives in Chicago.

  • Genevieve Bell,cultural anthropologist and vice president of Intel’s corporate strategy office. Bell has spent her career studying what she calls “the intersection of cultural practice and technology adoption.” At Intel, she leads a team of social scientists and designers who travel the world to learn how people relate to electronics and use their findings to shape technologies of the future. She lives in Oregon.

Think & Drink is a happy-hour series that sparks provocative conversations about big ideas. The 2015 Think & Drink series is supported by our media sponsor, Willamette Week, and funding from the Oregon Cultural Trust.

Reading and Discussion Programs for Portland-Area Veterans

Portland-area veterans and others who are interested in exploring the effects of war are invited to register for two upcoming programs.

How War Affects Us
Monthly program, open to all, begins February 3
Portland-area veterans, family members of veterans, and anyone who wants to understand the effects of war are invited to register for How War Affects Us, a free monthly discussion program at the American Legion Post 134 in Northeast Portland February 3 through July 7. Our country has recently been involved in two of the longest wars in our history. This group will explore what that means and how it affects us as individuals, as communities, and as a nation.

A group of between twenty and twenty-five people will meet once a month for six months. A meal will be provided at each session. The first five sessions will include readings and discussions about military service and the experience of war, readings from guest writers, and short writing workshops. The sixth session will be a public reading of participants’ writings. The program will be led by a trained facilitator who is also a veteran. Space is limited and spots will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

The program will take place the first Tuesday of each month from February 3 through July 7, 2015, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at American Legion Post 134, 2104 NE Alberta St., Portland.

To learn more about the program and register, please contact Sean Davis at (503) 679-3885 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

On Coming Home
Weekly program, open to veterans and families, begins February 21
Portland-area veterans and family members of veterans are invited to attend On Coming Home, a free weekly reading and discussion program at the Portland VA Medical Center February 21 through March 21, 2015. This is an opportunity to reflect on the military experience, talk about the challenges and opportunities of transitioning from active duty to civilian life, and create a sense of community among those sharing similar experiences.

A small group (fifteen people or fewer) will meet once a week for five weeks; lunch will be provided at each session. We will discuss articles and stories of military service throughout history. The discussions will be led by a trained facilitator who has experience working with veterans. Space is limited and spots will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

The program will take place Saturdays, February 21 through March 21, 2015, from noon to 2:00 p.m. at Portland VA Medical Center, 3710 SW U.S. Veterans Hospital Road.

To learn more about the program and register, please contact Valdez Bravo at (503) 220-8262, ext. 53082, or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

These programs are offered by Oregon Humanities in partnership with the Maine Humanities Council and eleven other state humanities councils across the country. The program has received major support from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Standing Together initiative, created to promote understanding of the military experience and to support returning veterans.

Stream Our Think & Drink with Cheryl Strayed

On October 23, 2014, author Cheryl Strayed joined Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, at the Alberta Rose Theatre in Portland for a conversation about the experience of having her private life become public through a best-selling book and major motion picture. Click here to watch a video of the event.

Cheryl Strayed is the author of the memoir Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, the novel Torch, and the essay collection Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar. Wild has stayed on The New York Times Best Seller List for more than a year, and a film adaptation starring Reese Witherspoon will be released in December. Strayed will discuss the experience of having her private life become public through a best-selling book and major motion picture.

The 2014 Think & Drink series is supported by our media sponsors, Oregon Public Broadcasting and Willamette Week, and funding from Columbia Bank and the Oregon Cultural Trust: Oregonians investing in Oregon’s arts, heritage, and humanities.

Programs

Oregon Humanities connects Oregonians with ideas that change lives and transform communities. Oregon Humanities programs, events, grants, and publications encourage Oregonians to learn about and discuss social, cultural, and public issues.

    Conversation Project offers Oregon nonprofits free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future.
    Humanity in Perspective (HIP) is a college-level humanities course offered in Portland. HIP provides economically and educationally disadvantaged individuals the opportunity to study the humanities with the guidance of Reed College professors.
    Idea Lab is a summer institute for Oregon teens and teachers who use the humanities to consider the pursuit of happiness and how it shapes our culture.

    Oregon Humanities magazine is a triannual publication devoted to exploring important and timely topics from a variety of perspectives and to stimulating reflection and public conversation.
    Public Program Grants provide financial support for nonprofit organizations across Oregon to conceive and implement public humanities programs.

    Think & Drink is a happy-hour conversation series that brings Portlanders together to discuss provocative ideas.

Oregon Humanities also convenes reading and discussion groups, hosts panel presentations on topics of public relevance and concern, and partners with community organizations on special projects.