Events & Opportunities

Photo of Conversation Project: What We Risk

June 8, 2019

Conversation Project: What We Risk

What do we risk when we lay ourselves open through music, painting, or any other art form? What might we give up and what might we gain when we set out to craft something beautiful or provocative or simply expressive that the world did not previously hold? Given today's artistic economy, to what extent is exposure—to other people and of the creative self—desirable? Join artist and educator Jason Graham, a slam poetry champion and speaker who performs hip hop as Mosley WOtta, for a conversation exploring the relationship between self-expression and vulnerability.

1:00 p.m., Tillamook County Pioneer Museum, Tillamook

June 11, 2019

Conversation Project: How Do We Create Equitable Spaces Within Our Public Lands?

The land and waterways of Oregon have always provided for its people and inhabitants, since time immemorial. In the last 200 years, the landscape has changed drastically. What does the past and present mean for the future of our natural lands? And for those who have been removed from these areas? Educator Gabe Sheoships leads a discussion about what a relationship with nature means, how we can provide inclusive and equitable spaces within our public lands and natural areas, and how we can begin to work toward healing relationships with our land. RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/how-do-we-create-equitable-spaces-within-our-public-lands-tickets-60426434091

6:00 p.m., Friends of Trees, Portland

June 13, 2019

Conversation Project: Beyond Invitation

Organizations and communities are working to invite broader groups of people to engage in their work as employees, patrons, board members, and donors. Having a statement at the end of a job announcement to encourage communities of color, queer people, and women to apply can be a start, but how do policies, environment, and culture support this invitation? How do they fail to support it? How do you know if a space is inclusive and accessible for all, and is such a goal even possible? What do you do about the tension between people who have different needs to feel included? Join Rachel Bernstein to explore what it takes to make the shift from invitation to inclusion.

6:30 p.m., Marys River Grange #685, Philomath

Photo of Conversation Project: How Do We Create Equitable Spaces Within Our Public Lands?

June 14, 2019

Conversation Project: How Do We Create Equitable Spaces Within Our Public Lands?

The land and waterways of Oregon have always provided for its people and inhabitants, since time immemorial. In the last 200 years, the landscape has changed drastically. What does the past and present mean for the future of our natural lands? And for those who have been removed from these areas? Educator Gabe Sheoships leads a discussion about what a relationship with nature means, how we can provide inclusive and equitable spaces within our public lands and natural areas, and how we can begin to work toward healing relationships with our land.

5:30 p.m., Port Orford Public Library, Port Orford

June 22, 2019

Conversation Project: Oregonians and the State’s Racist Past, Present, and Future

Oregon has a long history of racism that continues to influence the state today. While we often look at how the state’s racist history affects policies and institutions, we talk less about how it affects people’s personal understanding of racism and racist experiences. Join facilitator Tai Harden-Moore in a conversation that asks, What does Oregon’s racist past mean for Oregonians? How does the state’s history affect how bias shows up for individuals? This conversation will also look at how we can identify our own racial biases and work toward concrete ways to move forward as individuals and community.

3:30 p.m., Firelight Yoga, Portland

June 27, 2019

Conversation Project: Where Are Queer People Welcome?

A majority of Americans now accept gay and lesbian relationships, but the queer population is made up of a diversity of communities and experiences. Are all queer people accepted, tolerated, and embraced everywhere? Where are we made to feel welcome? Where do we feel unwelcome and unsafe? How do race, language, gender identity, family structure, faith, where we work, and where we live shape how we are seen, welcomed, and accepted? Join facilitator Jill Winsor in a discussion that explores how the complexity of the queer community intersects with the spaces and communities that surround us. This event will take place in the Keeston Room.

5:30 p.m., Friendly House, Portland

June 27, 2019

Conversation Project: Talking about Dying

Death is a universal event that transcends many of the differences between us, but it's not something that we have regular opportunities to think and talk about. Oregon Humanities developed the Talking about Dying program to create more public opportunities to reflect on the stories and influences that shape our thinking about death and dying and to hear perspectives and ideas from fellow community members. Talking about Dying community conversations are free, ninety-minute facilitated discussions geared toward public audiences (ages 15+). During the program, participants talk together about questions such as: What do we want—and not want—at the end of our life? How might our family, culture, religion, and beliefs shape how we think about death? How do access to care, geography, and desires to be remembered affect our decisions about the end of our life?

06:00 pm, Roseburg Public Library, Roseburg

Photo of Conversation Project: Seeing the Forest and the Trees

June 28, 2019

Conversation Project: Seeing the Forest and the Trees

We live in a state with abundant forests, and yet we don’t all see the same thing when we look into the woods. Oregon is known for both its timber industry and its deep environmental values. For many decades now management of our public forests has made headlines and driven apart neighbors. Facilitator Mariah Acton will lead this conversation to explore the values, identities, and beliefs we each have about our forests and what we, as a state, do to steward, manage, and protect this special resource.

7:00 p.m., Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, The Dalles

July 9, 2019

Conversation Project: Crime and Punishment in Oregon

From prisons and youth correctional facilities to schools and county jails, we’re surrounded by institutions that punish. But why do we punish? Why is punishment sometimes sanctioned by the state? Critics of the “prison industrial complex” argue that our methods and scale of punishment are informed by profit, while tough-on-crime policymakers believe that punishment must be meaningful enough to prevent recidivism and ensure public safety. Are there other ways to punish—such as restorative justice—that may be more effective, reasonable, or desirable? Philosopher and writer Monica Mueller facilitates a conversation around these questions and others regarding our motivation, purpose, and methods of punishment.

10:00am, Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, Lake Oswego

July 10, 2019

Conversation Project: How We Grow Old

What are the stories that shape how we think about growing old? How do we acknowledge the unique differences among aging individuals and separate the true stories from the myths? How do we accept the wisdom of our elders’ experiences while also recognizing new ideas about what it means to age in America? No matter our age, we all hear and tell stories about growing older that reflect our own ideals and fears—and the ideals and fears of our communities. Join facilitator Melissa Madenski as we look at the power of story in a conversation that will ask you to share your own experiences and ideas about aging and listen to the perspectives of others in your community.

3 p.m., Hoffman Center for the Arts, Manzanita