Listening to Young People

What does it look like when adults really listen to young people? Cultural beliefs about young people perpetuate myths that cause harm, especially when combined with laws that control their physical and emotional autonomy and limit their ability to participate in public life. Young people experiencing marginalization for any reason—race, gender, sexuality, ability—also have the added layer of not being taken seriously because of their age. And yet the history of social justice movements in the United States is deeply connected to young people’s agency, autonomy, and power. Join facilitator Emily Squires and a cofacilitator from the youth community for a conversation that asks folks to explore their own beliefs about what it means to be young and to reflect on their individual relationship to power as it relates to age.

Leader

Emily Squires | Portland

Emily Squires is an artist and educator who works as a facilitator and consultant for the Center for Equity and Inclusion in Portland.  Alongside her experience in community organizing, youth justice, and education, Squires is also trained as a printmaker and uses art-making as an organizing tool. Her multidisciplinary and collaborative art practice and political work investigates themes such as voice, participation, belonging, and love.

Program Themes

Community , Education , Identity

Equipment Needs

flip chart paper