Fish Tales

Traditions and Challenges of Seafood in Oregon

Oregonians love the wild beauty of our 363 miles of coastline, but finding truly local seafood can be hard, even on the coast. The US imports approximately 90 percent of its seafood and ships out nearly as much to the global market. Why aren't we eating more local seafood, now that preserving and distribution technologies are the most sophisticated they have ever been? Why do we consider seafood more a delicacy now than it has been in the past? In this conversation, food writer Jennifer Burns Bright helps participants explore our relationship with the products of the sea and cultural traditions involving fishing, eating seafood, and understanding the ocean's bounty and challenges.

Leader

Jennifer Burns Bright | Port Orford | wellsuited@gmail.com

Jennifer Burns Bright is a food and travel writer based in Port Orford, Oregon. She recently retired from teaching at the University of Oregon, where she researched desire in twentieth-century literature, led a faculty research group in the emerging discipline of food studies, and won a national pedagogy award for a team-taught, interdisciplinary class on bread. She holds a PhD from the University of California at Irvine and a Master Food Preserver certification. As a community organizer linking local producers and consumers, Bright often speaks and teaches at events. When she's not out gathering seaweed or smoking black cod, she might be found judging culinary masterpieces or interviewing luminaries in the food world. She still misses cohosting the fabulous radio program

Program Themes

Food , Global and Local

Equipment Needs

Digital projector, screen, chalk/whiteboard